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Regional Economy

Onosys - photo Bob Perkoski

To many, regionalism is the term used to describe the consolidation of countless redundant municipalities. While useful, necessary and inevitable, that aspect of regionalism is not intrinsically accurate, at least according to those whose mission it is to market Northeast Ohio. True regionalism, they argue, is defined by economic activity, not political boundaries. With major hubs like Cleveland, Akron, Canton and Youngstown, the 16-county "Cleveland Plus" region covers more than 6,000 square miles and is home to over 4 million people. Uniting that region and marketing its unique and sweeping assets is what true regionalism is all about.

Features

Tawnee McCluskey

want to get people back to work? fill the basic skills gap

Low-income workers often lack the basic skills needed to find a good job. To bridge the gap, experts says it's essential to invest in training. Yet despite millions of people out of work, programs are hard to find.

View of the city from Riverbed along the planned Lake Link Trail

the flats are back: five big and small projects reshaping the city's oldest neighborhood

After a decade of standing still, the Flats are on the move. Check out some of the newest developments changing this mixed-use neighborhood, from the Lake Link Trail to plans for a new boathouse on the Cuyahoga River.

Ronn Richard - Centennial Meeting

q&a: ronn richard, president of the cleveland foundation

In this candid, wide-ranging interview, the leader of the Cleveland Foundation discusses its centennial gifts, the Greater University Circle Initiative, the Transformation Plan and more.

Cleveland Clothing Co T-shirt

cleveland's commercial real estate market: a heat check

Brain gain, urbanization and increased development has created a demand in downtown living space. Historically, vacant buildings in need of change are targeted for this purpose. Lately, however, buildings with office tenants are being adapted or proposed for residential.

Dennis Joyce (left) career development specialist - Plus 50 Encore Completion program

a new age: local groups provide resources, advocacy for cleveland's older workers

Workers aged 40 and over might not fit the typical hip innovator profile, but they are often undervalued. Some may be former CEOs of large companies, arriving with particular skill sets that mesh with growth industries like biomedicine or advanced materials.
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Regional Economy Founders

julie and shawn warren

julie and shawn warren

City: Lakewood

Meet Julie and Shawn Warren, founders of Erie Design, a family-owned and operated sign company in Lakewood.

lynde vespoli

lynde vespoli

City: Cleveland

Meet Lynde Vespoli, founder of Discover My Cleveland, a destination management company with nine part-time tour directors and one fulltime employee.

todd pownell

todd pownell

City: MidTown

Meet Todd Pownell, owner of TAP by Todd Pownell, a designer jewelry firm in Midtown with a team of four.

fred geis

fred geis

City: Streetsboro

Meet Fred Geis, founder of Geis Companies, a northeast Ohio design/build company with 140 employees.

kurt rote

kurt rote

City: Downtown

Meet Kurt Rote, founder of Western Oncolytics, a developer of novel cancer therapies.

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