| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter RSS Feed

In The News

776 Articles | Page: | Show All

Adult big wheel relay to roll through Tremont tomorrow

Tomorrow, June 25, from 2 – 5 p.m. in Lincoln Park on W. 11th Street in Tremont, the fourth annual Cleveland Big Wheel Relay to benefit the Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center will roll out.

Adult teams have raised funds to compete in a tournament racing Huffy Green Machine three-wheel bikes, which are designed to handle adult bodies. This year, an additional track will allow individuals to participate in timed, individual races. The event is free to attend.
 
The Big Wheel Relay is organized and hosted by the New Partners of Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (CHSC), an associate board of young professionals focused on advancing CHSC’s mission both through service and fundraising. For more details about CHSC New Partners and this event, please visit this page.
 

Cleveland Cavaliers in the news across the globe and beyond

It seems Cavs fever has spread to news outlets far and wide and .... above.

Laramie, Wyoming, loves LeBron as evidenced by this local fan roundup: "Larry Shyatt recently stepped down as the Wyoming men’s basketball coach. In 1964, he was there to see Cleveland win its last championship before Sunday night, when the Browns beat the Baltimore Colts 27-0 in the NFL Championship Game, two years before it was dubbed the Super Bowl."

Ever concerned about the high and mighty dollar, earlier this month the San Francisco-based Market Watch explained Why it pays to be a Cleveland Cavaliers fan.

And then there was this from the Manila Times ahead of the historic Game 7 win: "Despite the feat of LeBron James and Kyrie Irving pulling the Cleveland Cavaliers within 3-2 in the ongoing best-of-seven series of the National Basketball Association Finals, the majority of Filipino NBA fans see the Golden State Warriors retaining the crown."

Or not.

But perhaps most notably, the Onion reported this from The Heavens: "Despite allowing the Cavaliers to win the city’s first major sports championship in 52 years, God Almighty, Creator of Heaven and Earth, confirmed Sunday that He still hates Cleveland fans. 'I just figured that enough is enough, so I decided to throw them a bone and finally give them a title, but believe me, I still can’t stand Cleveland teams or their fans,' said the Lord."

Well then, perhaps we can win God Almighty over for the Indians during this year's World Series.

Cleveland Neighborhood Guidebook excerpt: a peek inside the Velvet Tango Room

Tomorrow evening at 7 p.m. at the Market Garden Brewery, 1947 West 25th St., local publisher Belt Books will launch its Cleveland Neighborhood Guidebook with readings by Janice Lowe, Sally Errico and Sam McNulty. Several contributors and sponsors will be at this free event.  
 
As a preview, the publishers have shared the following "Editors' Pick" from the volume, an "homage to The Velvet Tango Room."

Visiting Cleveland for the first time? Have an event to celebrate? Go to the Velvet Tango Room.

Paulius Nasvytis was early to the cocktail trend when he opened this inimitable, only-in-Cleveland bar in 1996. Nasvytis’s staff mix Pisco Sours and French 75s for loyal patrons, suits, local politicos, and out-of-towners who make it a destination spot. Finding it is part of the experience, as the VTR is located on a desolate stretch of a post-industrial street that is always neither here nor there.

Signs outside are off-putting, warning “no big hair” and “no golf shoes,” but everything inside is inviting. Somehow the VTR manages to be pretentious and down- to-earth at once.

Nasvytis is a first-generation Lithuanian immigrant who opened the bar after working for years at Cleveland’s upscale French hotel restaurant, Classics. Many nights he floats throughout the bar, dressed in a three-piece suit, sometimes presenting women with long-stemmed roses. VIPs are ushered into the hidden “members only” back room where, because everything is surprising at the VTR, busts of Lenin, Mussolini and Mao—“deposed dictators doomed to live in this capitalist hell,” Paulius explains — line the shelves.

The backstory, location, and atmosphere of the VTR mix Cleveland ambitions, failures, and distinctiveness, and the drinks are no less complex and delightful. The staff make their own maraschino cherries, ginger ale, and bitters. The bartenders have ripped biceps from shaking cocktails by hand. They flambee orange slices and shake egg whites into soft peaks for Ramos Gin Fizzes. It is expensive (for Cleveland) and cheap (for what you get) at once. At the VTR, some weird alchemy makes it all work.
 

An open letter to the Salt Lake City Deseret News

Dear fellow journalists,
 
On June 11, the following headline ran in your admirable publication:
 
"It looks like Cleveland's championship curse will continue"
 
What followed was an opinion piece by the venerable Randy Hollis, who went on to suggest that Cleveland was the "City that always weeps" amid other transcendent observations such as "And now, with LeBron James and the Cavaliers just one loss away from succumbing to the Golden State Warriors in the NBA Finals for a second straight year, it looks like the "Cleveland Curse" is about to continue."
 
Oh dear ….
 
Now then, we appreciate your jocularity and have been trying to find a way to return the favor. Perhaps Mr. Hollis is the "writer who shouldn't have said a peep" or the Deseret's good editor, Mr. Paul S. Edwards is the "editor that didn't go too deep," but we can probably all agree those are a bit clunky to say the least.
 
No matter.
 
As our esteemed colleagues, we also appreciate that you would step up to the plate – perhaps one in Progressive Field, wherein the Indians (which are leading in the in the AL Central) bested the White Sox in the 10th inning just yesterday – and offer commentary on sports franchises 1,700 miles away. After all, while you do an excellent job of covering high school soccer, we certainly understand the desire to stretch one's legs.
 
We also note you describe your mission thusly: "to be a leading news brand for faith and family oriented audiences in Utah and around the world."
 
Hm. Too bad that faith didn't extend to the Cleveland Cavaliers.
 
As you can imagine, here in Cleveland we are busy bathing ourselves in wine and gold, but we felt a need to check in just the same. As for Mr. Hollis, perhaps he should focus on "copy editing and page layout/design" and leave the sports predictions to those who are a little closer to the game.  

With our warmest regards,
 
Erin O'Brien
Managing Editor
Fresh Water Cleveland
 

LeBron and the Monsters are all out, Trump gets all in - to the Q

From Jeremy W. Peters for the New York Times:

A series of delays and questions about security and fund-raising are causing Republicans to scramble as they finish planning their nominating convention just weeks before the party gathers in Cleveland.

Among the complications facing Donald J. Trump, the presumptive nominee, and his team is that only on Friday were they finally able to gain access to Quicken Loans Arena, where the convention will be held, because it was being used by LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers, who won Game 6 of the N.B.A. finals there on Thursday night. (The series will end on Sunday night, with a decisive Game 7 on the Golden State Warriors’ home court back in California.)

“LeBron, good luck in the series,” Mr. Trump said the other day as he noted the predicament with a sense of resignation. “Of course, the longer it goes, the less time we have. But that’s O.K.”

Get the whole story, including preparation and funding details, from the New York Times here.
 

Federation of Gay Games' Orlando Tragedy Statement

In August 2014, rainbows bloomed from Lakewood to Akron when the Gay Games came to town. The region asserted itself as welcome and inclusive; and Northeast Ohio's friendship with the Federation of Gay Games and all the people it represents was public and proud.

Hence as the country mourns the Orlando victims, Fresh Water respectfully offers the Federation's formal statement.


As the world mourns the tragic events that took place at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando this past Sunday, 12 June 2016, the Federation of Gay Games family extends its condolences and support to the victims, their families, friends and associates, and the citizens of Orlando, Florida.

This act of violence directly impacts the global Gay Games family. Four years ago, the City of Orlando was a bid candidate to host Gay Games 10 in 2018. Pulse Nightclub was a local supporter of that effort. In addition, athletes and artists from Orlando have participated at each quadrennial Gay Games since 1982.
 
Whenever the LGBT community and our allies come under attack, as it was in Orlando and the recent murder of activists in Bangladesh and Honduras, we strengthen our resolve to fight on in honor of those lost. The events of June 12 are a reminder to all of us how precious life is, and why we must continue to work together to promote acceptance and inclusion to defeat homophobia, sexism, racism, and other forms of discrimination worldwide.
 
The Federation of Gay Games will continue to lead this effort through the use of sport and culture to promote our founding principles of Participation, Inclusion, Personal Best™, and encourage our sisters, brothers and allies to join us for Paris 2018 Gay Games 10 with our message of “All Equal”. Together, we are stronger.
 
On behalf of the FGG Board of Directors, our Assembly, and Honorary Life Members, we remain yours in sport and solidarity,
 
Joanie Evans and Kurt Dahl
Co-Presidents

County: 18 percent of home-improvement stores fail price-check sweep

About 18 percent of home-improvement stores failed a price-check sweep conducted by the Cuyahoga County Department of Consumer Affairs. Most of the pricing errors favored consumers – and some went the other way.


Get all the details here.
 

Serving tea, Islam and understanding in Cleveland

Angelo Merendino of Aljazeera tells the fascinating tale of Ayman Alkayali, the man behind Algebra Tea House in Little Italy. From the feature:

In the early days of Algebra's existence, Ayman faced great opposition. "Many neighbourhood residents didn't want me to be here." There were offers to buy him out, a steady stream of inspectors scrutinised every detail of the shop's renovation, and people shouted racial slurs as they drove by. "I had my struggles and had to go through that for a tough three years in the beginning. Thankfully, there were residents who stood up for me; without them it would have been a much more difficult fight."

Read the whole story here.

Salt Lake City "wordsmith" offers up snarky Cleveland nickname

Perhaps someone ought to tell Randy Hollis of the Deseret News that the Lake Erie Monsters won the Calder Cup Championship last night and that the Cavs haven't lost the series to Golden State just yet.

Instead of recognizing any of that, Hollis wants to hand Clevelanders a tissue from his desk in (ahem) Utah. Here is an excerpt from his latest "effort."

New York City has long been called "The City That Never Sleeps."

And for the past 50-plus years, Cleveland could very well be called "The City That Always Weeps."

Not since 1964, when star running back Jim Brown led the Cleveland Browns to the National Football League championship, has that Midwestern city been able to say it's the home of a major professional sports champion.


The City That Always Weeps, eh? Very clever, Mr. Hollis.

If you want to, read the rest of his "writing" here.
 

Funding to help tackle infant mortality

First Year Cleveland, an initiative aimed at reducing infant mortality in Cleveland and Cuyahoga County, has been awarded more than $2.9 million from the Ohio Department of Medicaid.
 
The overall infant mortality rate, which includes babies who die before their first birthday, in Cuyahoga County is 8.1 out of 1,000 live births. In Cleveland it is around 13. The national rate is 5.87.
 
The state funding will support:
 
Centering Pregnancy – a unique program that provides prenatal care and birth-related information and support to pregnant women in a group setting. The number of women participating in centering pregnancy is expected to increase to 375 women. Funding: $760,000
 
Home Visiting Programs – through partnerships with MomsFirst, the Ohio Infant Mortality Reduction Initiative and other programs, first-time mothers receive valuable knowledge and support in such as prenatal care, breastfeeding, safe sleep and family planning.  Funding: $2 million
 
Local Fatherhood Initiatives – support and funding to target and teach new fathers how to care for their new babies.  Funding: $200,000
 
“First Year Cleveland is an important collaboration between the City of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, the philanthropic community and area health systems,” said Cleveland City Council President Kevin Kelley in a statement. “The infant mortality rate in Greater Cleveland is shockingly high and, therefore, demands attention by our entire community.”
 
Cuyahoga County is one of nine Ohio communities engaged through the Ohio Department of Medicaid to identify innovative projects that connect at-risk women and infants to quality health care and care management.
 

Historic Birdtown Walk & Picnic set for this Sunday

LakewoodAlive and the Lakewood Historical Society will host the inaugural Historic Birdtown Walk & Picnic on Sunday, June 12, from noon to 4 p.m. at Madison Park.
 
The celebratory event kicks off with a community picnic from noon to 2 p.m. at the pavilion near Madison Park’s George Usher Field. Food and drinks will be provided, courtesy of The Gorilla Lakewood.
 
The festivities continue with guided walking tours of the Historic Birdtown neighborhood commencing at 1 p.m. The tours will depart from the corner of Madison and Halstead Avenues every half-hour until 2:30 p.m., affording participants an enriched perspective of this proud, working-class neighborhood in eastern Lakewood.
 
Following a neighborhood tour, participants will have a chance to walk through the Templar Motors Factory display within the Lake Erie Building at the south end of Madison Park.

More details are available here.

Get innovative at free think[box] Tuesdays this month

Explore all the creative possibilities in Case Western Reserve University’s Larry Sears and Sally Zlotnick Sears think[box] this summer at “think[box] Tuesdays. The university’s innovation center, at 11201 Cedar Ave., will host free public events from  5 to 7:30 p.m. every Tuesday in June, welcoming members of the local community to check out the facility and indulge their inner maker through a variety of activities and projects.
 
Live music and food available for purchase, featuring a different local food truck each week, will be presented. Fawaky Burst, which offers healthy smoothies and wraps, will be on hand at the first event June 7. The band Surf Deer will perform.
 
Each event focuses on a different theme. The series kicks off June 7 with “Intro to Thinking Beyond the Possible,” where attendees will get the chance to use the laser cutter in Sears think[box] to make a keychain.
 
Future events include:
 
June 14: Being Fearless: Let’s Create Together
Using abstract art to help us reimagine Cleveland

June 21: Collaborative Creativity
Discover Sears think[box] through a pinhole camera

June 28: Creative Endeavors in Cleveland
Learn from creative enthusiasts from all over Cleveland
 
The events are free and open to the public. Visit the Facebook event page to RSVP.
 

First cohort of grads from Comprehensive Reentry Services program honored at Euclid Jail

Last night, Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish joined Cuyahoga County Corrections to congratulate the first cohort of graduates of the Comprehensive Reentry Services program. Students have completed more than 165 hours of classroom and hands-on training over the past nine weeks. They learned baseline kitchen, safety, preparation and cooking skills and earned a three-year Servsafe Food Handler certification through the National Restaurant Association.
 
“Too often, individuals who have paid their debt to society confront many obstacles to good jobs and quality education and training”, said County Executive Budish in a statement.
 
“It's exciting to see the progress of these individuals and the culinary program”, added Ken Mills, Cuyahoga County Director of Regional Corrections.  
 
The voluntary program fosters pre- and post-release employment and job readiness for male adult individuals serving court sentences with the County jail and housed at the Euclid facility. 
 
Euclid service providers are Towards Employment, Recovery Resources and Project Learn. Services to be provided pre-release at the Euclid facility include: employment assessment, individual success plan, career exploration, job readiness skills training, ABLE/GED classes, behavioral health/substance abuse counseling services, Thinking for a Change workshops, and culinary arts training.
 
To be eligible, inmates must be convicted as an adult and imprisoned under the municipal, county, Federal, or state law but have not been convicted of a sexual offense other than prostitution; and have enough time remaining on the sentence to complete the program.
 
Post release, previous offenders will continue to receive ongoing services as well as additional supportive services to help them successfully reenter the community and find employment.
 
“Their accomplishments demonstrate the potential impact of innovative and collaborative programming,” said Mills of the graduates and program.
 
Partly funded from the U.S. Department of Labor grant; Comprehensive Reentry Services is a collaborative partnership that includes Cuyahoga County Corrections, OhioMeansJobs|Cleveland-Cuyahoga County, and Cuyahoga County Office of Reentry and Edwin’s Leadership and Institute.
 

TRANSPORT to feature Groynom, Valdivieso

On Friday, June 10, from 7:30 – 10 p.m., the Wine Spot, 2271 Lee Road, will host the opening of TRANSPORT. Fresh Water contributor and nationally recognized photographer Rebecca Groynom will present her photography alongside artist Rafael Valdiviseo's work. Additionally, New Zealand born, artist and musician Brent Gemmill will exhibit his interactive media.
 
The opening event will feature an eclectic fusion harp performance by Stephan Haluska. TRANSPORT will be on display through Sept. 2.

For more information, visit the respective pages of Groynom and Valdivieso.

Capitol Theatre to screen doc highlighting rights for intelligent primates: "Unlocking the Cage"

In the wake of the controversial and deeply troubling story of Harambe, the rare silverback gorilla that was killed after a 4-year-old boy fell into the moat surrounding his environment at the Cincinnati Zoo, the Cleveland Cinemas yesterday announced the screening of a film that highlights primates in captivity and animal rights.
 
From July 1 -7, the Capitol Theatre, 1390 W. 65th St., will present Unlocking the Cage, which tells the story of Steven Wise, an activist lawyer who brings a unique animal rights case to court. His goal is to get legal personhood granted for a chimpanzee in order to get the animal released from terrible conditions. The documentary aims to make the viewer re-examine how humans treat intelligent animals.
 
The screening is part of the theatre's Capitol Selects program, which will feature limited one-week engagements that will include a mix of documentaries, foreign films and classic movies on a dedicated screen.  The program begins June 3 and extends though July. In addition to Unlocking the Cage, the 17 associated movies include Viva, Suspicion and Tickled.
 
776 Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts