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44 Cleveland Heights Articles | Page: | Show All

cle named by mag as one of nation's 'best up-and-coming nightlife cities'

Women's Health magazine teamed up with Yelp to find the “fittest, artsiest, foodiest, and just plain coolest cities on the rise in America.” The results of their research landed them this list: Social Climbers: 5 Best Up-and-Coming Nightlife Cities. Cleveland is among the best.

“For our first ever Social Cities package in the October 2014 issue of Women's Health, we teamed up with data scientists at Yelp to help us find the best (and most surprising) cities across America for different types of social scenes. For cities to rank high for nightlife, we looked at bars of all types --champagne bars, dive bars, gay bars, hookah bars, Irish pubs, sports bars, wine bars... you name it! We also looked for cities with a ton of dance clubs, night clubs, a solid karaoke scene, pool halls... and so much more. The five fantastic cities that we named our top up-and-coming nightlife hotspots had a LOT of all of the above on offer. If you're looking for a seriously fun road trip with your closest girlfriends, you should definitely add any of these bumping cities to your must-visit list.”

2. Cleveland, OH

“Sure, Cleveland has always rocked. Now, thanks to three reinvigorated neighborhoods, the city's nightlife pulses with a new sophistication. We're not talking cookie-cutter poshness: The after-dark ambience in these trendsetting locales are decidedly diverse.”

Mentioned in the item are the Horseshoe Casino, Ohio City's West 25th Street, Uptown, Cleveland Orchestra's Severance Hall, Cleveland Heights and The Grog Shop.
 
Read the rest right here.
 

university study ranks cities' walkability; cleveland in top 10

In a recently released report by the Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis at George Washington University School of Business in conjunction with Smart Growth America, the 30 largest U.S. cities were ranked by how walkable they are. This is key indicator on how cities are shifting from suburban sprawl to urban infill.
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“The researchers, including Leinberger, first looked at Walkscore heat maps, focusing on areas that scored high. They then looked at areas with significant regional importance, meaning they have at least 1.4 million square feet of office space and more than 340,000 square feet of retail space. They combined these factors to determine areas they call "walkable urban places" or WalkUPs.”

But the report doesn’t just evaluate the present; it looks ahead.

“Researchers then tried to predict how these areas would grow in the future by looking at trend lines and pricing premiums in rent space, which indicate demand level. For example, demand around train stations in places like Washington, D.C. is so high commercial and residential renters can pay a premium of between 50 and 80 percent, said Emerick Corsi, president of Cleveland-based Forest City Enterprises Real Estate Services.

Coming in at No. 10 is Cleveland.

“Ohio's largest city hangs on to the bottom spot in the Top 10, but that may change soon. It's set to plummet to No. 24 in the future. Cleveland is one of a handful of older industrial cities where walkability is largely rooted in the past, where a strong city center is walkable while the rest of the surrounding suburban area lacks any kind of walkable urban space.”

Read the rest here.

newsweek highlights lee road, the 'bitcoin boulevard' in cleveland heights

In a Newsweek article titled "Bitcoin Makes the Jump to Brick-and-Mortar in Cleveland," reporter Joe Kloc describes the details of a new digital currency, Bitcoin, and how numerous retailers on Lee Road in Cleveland Heights have adapted the system.

"Most of the customers at Mitchell’s Fine Chocolates in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, are locals who have been reared from birth on its chocolate-covered marshmallows, pecan turtles and half-dipped apricots," Kloc writes. "But lately, says Bill Mitchell, the shop’s 54-year-old proprietor, there have been some new faces."
 
Mitchell goes on to describe a fresh-faced couple who recently shopped at his store, and while the visit was unremarkable, the payment was anything but.
 
“I couldn’t even tell you what they bought,” the Mitchell confessed. But what he does remember is how the couple paid: "with about 0.12 bitcoins."

"Mitchell is one of a dozen shop owners on Lee Road in Cleveland Heights who have joined together to accept the controversial digital cryptocurrency in the hope of attracting new customers, and as a way to avoid credit card fees. Since May 1, bitcoiners have traveled to the tree-lined street in northeast Ohio from as far away as North Carolina. Here, they trade their bitcoins for ice cream cones, haircuts and handmade Colombian bracelets, and are sent off with a 'buh-bye now,' the local parlance on what bills itself as America’s first Bitcoin Boulevard."

“We don’t expect a windfall,” says Nikhil Chand, founder of the bitcoin consultancy CoinNEO, who conceived of Bitcoin Boulevard late last year. “This is about so much more -- about the hurt from the fees through traditional payment.”

Read the rest of the story here.


 

melt bar & grilled among '21 best sando shops in usa'

Thrillist, the digital magazine for men, recently published a feature on the "The 21 Best Sandwich Shops in America." Writer Adam Lapetina included Melt Bar & Grilled in the listing.

"The perfect sandwich is hard to find," Lapetina writes. "But when you do find it, you have to pay homage. From superior ingredients to the freshest-baked bread and sauces that make you say, "Dammit, I kind of want to drink that!", the ideal sammie has to strike a delicate balance, and the people who make them have hit upon something way more important than just a portable meal."

In his entry for Melt, Lapetina writes:

"Cleveland’s got its fair share of interesting people, but not all of them open tattoo-friendly, punk-rock-playing alternative grilled cheese joints, like Matt Fish did when he first founded Melt Bar & Grilled in 2006. Offering patrons who get a Melt tattoo 25% off for life is only the second of his selling points -- the first is grilling up insane grilled cheese sandwiches that keep Ohioans coming back time and time again. The Parmageddon, for example, rocks potato & onion pierogi, sauerkraut, sharp cheddar, and sauteed onions and is every bit as face-melting as its name would suggest."
 
Read the rest here.


toledo blade previews cleveland international film festival

In an article in the Toledo Blade titled, "Cleveland to heat up for film lovers," Kirk Baird previews the Cleveland International Film Festival, which he labels as Ohio’s biggest such event.
 
"The Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF) line-up of more than 350 independent films isn’t for everyone, particularly those who prefer movies with celebrity names in the credits," Baird writes. "But for those open to the concept of film as true art rather than commercial enterprise, the long-running festival has much to satisfy the soul and mind."
 
Baird goes on to offer a rundown of the offerings, noting the staggering growth of the decades-old event.
 
 "Now in its 38th year, CIFF is a prominent regional -- and certainly Ohio’s biggest -- film festival, with a combined audience of 95,000 film lovers and filmmakers from around the world expected to attend -- a staggering growth in audience from its first year in 1977 when only eight friends watched a few weekend films at the festival’s first home, Cedar Lee Theatre in Cleveland Heights."
 
Read the entire article here.


#thisiscle promo video goes viral in 3- 2- 1...

On Wednesday, Positively Cleveland, the convention and visitors bureau for Cleveland, announced a new destination brand, presented new plans for its destination development initiatives, unveiled a local social media movement and highlighted a series of organizational accomplishments.
 
But without question, the most buzzed about element of the package was the following video, "A Cleveland Anthem," which promotes the theme: "Cleveland doesn’t follow anyone’s rules – it makes its own."




forbes profiles local 'edisons' nottingham and spirk

In an article titled "The Invention Machine: Cleveland Duo Churns Out Ideas Worth Billions," written by Michael Nemeth and published in the March issue of Forbes, the founding partners of Nottingham Spirk are profiled.
 
"The closest thing in America to Thomas Edison’s New Jersey laboratory is a decommissioned Christian Science church in Cleveland. It’s here that John Nottingham, John Spirk and their team of 70 inventors, tinkerers and support staff have cooked up the Swiffer SweeperVac, Crest Spinbrush, Dirt Devil vacuum and nearly 1,000 other patented products. No, nothing as momentous as the light bulb or the phonograph, but in their nearly anonymous way -- even in Ohio, almost no one has heard of them -- Nottingham and Spirk have proven themselves as good at making money as the Wizard of Menlo Park himself."
 
“We’re probably responsible for more patents than any other company our size,” says Nottingham.
 
Read the rest right here.


new study on regionalism comes at ideal time, says next city

In a feature titled "Three Lessons on Regionalism," Bill Bradley, writing for Next City, outlines the findings of a report recently released by Fund for Our Economic Future.
 
"Regionalism, from Paris to Portland, offers cities with closely woven outlying suburbs opportunities to broaden their tax bases, increase minimum wages and develop unified approaches to transit -- which could, in turn, give low-wage workers better access to jobs. Advocates have touted these benefits for years. Now, a new report explores how regional collaboration can help spur economic growth."
 
The Northeast Ohio-based Fund for Our Economic Future, which along with the Knight Foundation, released the report.
 
In sum: "Data is hugely important, investing in groups that find funding can enlarge your pools of grant money, and big thinkers must be instrumental in turning those grand ideas into reality."
 
Read the rest here.


recent melt opening featured in columbus dispatch

In a Columbus Dispatch business piece titled “Cleveland grilled-cheese sandwich chain arrives in Short North,” writer Denise Trowbridge highlights Matt Fish’s Melt Bar & Grilled and his decision to test the waters by opening a location in Columbus.
 
“I am nervous, but we had to take the plunge. That’s just part of growing,” Fish was quoted in the piece. “We want to become a regional restaurant group and open a couple more in Columbus, but we have to start with one and make that one the best we can.”
 
Trowbridge goes on to detail many of the aspects we Clevelanders already know and love about Melt, including its signature sandwiches, fabulous beer selection, infamous Melt Challenge, and the 25 percent discount for life for those who add a melt tattoo.
 
Check out the full story here.

heights libraries claim top rating from library journal fifth straight year

For the fifth year in a row, the Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library system has received the highest possible rating in the Library Journal’s 2013 Index of Public Library Service. Library Journal is a trade journal that reports news about the library world and has a nation-wide circulation of 100,000.

The five-star rating is given to the top U.S. libraries each year. Heights Libraries has earned five stars in five out of the six years that Library Journal has published the ratings, starting in 2008.

Libraries are rated on four criteria: circulation, visits, program attendance and Internet terminal use (public computers).
“This shows what we’ve known all along: People in our community are using the library regularly,” says Heights Libraries Director Nancy Levin. “For many customers we’ve become that 'third place,' the place besides work and home where they like to be. We are always busy, and I don’t see that trend reversing anytime soon.”

Heights Libraries wasn’t the only other Cuyahoga County area library receiving Star Awards; other area libraries to win are Cleveland Public (4 stars), Cuyahoga County (5 stars), and Lakewood (4 stars).

Read the rest of the report here.

d.c. streets covers major policy shift at local planning agency

In a DC Streets Blog post titled "In Cleveland, An Old-School Planning Agency Sees the Light," writer Angie Schmitt writes of the dramatic turn around currently talking place at Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency (NOACA), a topic Fresh Water recently covered in depth.
 
"NOACA was so notoriously averse to change and ineffectual that it acquired the nickname NO ACTION," Schmitt writes. "But as impossible as it seemed even a year ago, things are changing at NOACA. They’re changing fast, and for the better. Last year the agency hired a new director, Grace Gallucci, who had been the head of finance for the Chicago Transit Authority. Since the Cleveland native assumed her role at the head of the NOACA, the region agency has adopted a completely different tenor."

Read more about how the local planning agency is shifting gears here.


ny times gives ink to new rust belt mag 'belt'

In a New York Times Arts Beat post titled “New Magazine Celebrates ‘Rust Belt Chic,’ With a Wink,” writer Jennifer Schuessler details her conversation with Belt magazine editor Anne Trubek about a new publication dedicated to fostering a new journalistic beat in Cleveland.
 
"The decaying cities of the post-industrial Midwest can sometimes seem like a museum of things America used to make: cars, refrigerators, steel, televisions. But if a start-up in Cleveland gets its way, the region may help rebuild the market for another endangered product -- long-form magazine journalism," Schuessler writes.
The magazine offers up a collection of essays and reporting that seeks to explore the regional identity that is known as the Rust Belt.
 
“I cringe at words like ‘authentic,’” Trubek says in the article. “But the rust belt aesthetic isn’t about the ephemeral global economy, it’s about boots on the ground and things hidden in grandma’s attic. We want to explore that.”
 
Check out the full interview here.


men's journal drops into cleveland for a visit

In a Men's Journal travel feature titled "Visiting Cleveland, on Purpose," writer Robert Reid manages to enjoy himself during an action-packed visit to town -- and also manages to trot out a few hackneyed affronts as well.
 
"Spread out on the south shore of Lake Erie, 'The Forest City' -- called the 'mistake by the lake' by the sort of people who talk like that -- is a pleasant surprise for visitors who actually make the trip," Reid writes. "Just the names of the neighborhoods, including Slavic Village, Little Italy, and Asiatown, are a tribute to the city’s melting-pot roots, which manifest in great fusion cuisine."

In the piece, Reid mentions Happy Dog, Beachland Ballroom, the Orchestra, Big Fun, MOCA, Melt and others.
 
Read the rest of the (back-handed) compliment here.


wine mag highlights trio of local gems

In a Wine Enthusiast Magazine story titled “Hot in Cleveland: Three Wine Bars to Visit in Cleveland,” the editors point out that Cleveland is attracting the likes of young artists, artisans, and web entrepreneurs due to modestly priced real estate and an above-average food and beverage scene.
 
“And while the food and beer scenes have always been strong (C-town is home to Michael Symon's empire and the Great Lakes Brewing Co.), this recent trend is raising the culture quotient and energizing the wine scene. There is life beyond the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame in Cleveland.”
 
Market Avenue Wine Bar, La Cave du Vin and Lola Bistro each provide a unique draw to the young and old alike, from high ceilings, parquet floors, and easy access to the West Side Market for Market Avenue Wine Bar to the genius of Michael Symon’s culinary team at Lola, Cleveland has plenty to keep folks returning for more.
 
Enjoy the full story here.


rust wire discusses 'clevelandish' life of harvey pekar

In a Rust Wire feature titled “The Oh-So-Clevelandish Life of Harvey Pekar,” Angie Schmitt shares her thoughts on the late Harvey Pekar in an article than does not necessarily honor his accomplishments as a writer, but the genius behind his work.
 
“Here is this creative genius and intellectual and he won’t follow his doctor wife out of the region because he has a civil service job -- a steady, reliable government job. That is the most Cleveland, the most Rust Belt, move ever. In a scary economy, get that government job and cling to it for dear life,” Schmitt writes.
 
“That is the Cleveland way. The dream. It’s a pretty freaking sad one, if you ask me, but one that still holds a powerful appeal in this region, especially for older people. And I guess if you have a mortgage and a family and you’re watching your regional economy unravel, it makes a lot of sense,” Schmitt continues.
 
Enjoy the full tribute here.

44 Cleveland Heights Articles | Page: | Show All
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