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Calabrese advocates for transit funding at Statehouse

Joe Calabrese, CEO and General Manager of the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (RTA) advocated for more transit funding in testimony on Feb. 16 at the Statehouse.

"RTA is the largest public transportation agency in Ohio. My employees, who reside in 16 of Ohio counties, serve approximately 50 million customers each year in Cuyahoga and several neighboring counties," said Calabrese in his address.

"Public transit in Ohio is a $900 million industry that supports many manufacturers, suppliers and jobs.

Public transit gets workers to work, students to school, connects important destinations, drives economic development and provides mobility to many Ohioans who have no other mobility option due to economic realities or disabilities."

Read his comments in their entirety here.
 

Vibrant City Awards attract sold-out crowd, celebrate urban champions

On Tuesday, over 500 guests gathered at the Victory Center in the Health-Tech Corridor for the first-ever Vibrant City awards, hosted by Cleveland Neighborhood Progress.

CNP President Joel Ratner told the crowd, “The facts are there. Data shows that our region is gaining brains and income, our city schools are making terrific improvements, and Cleveland’s population loss is ending. We are headed into an era of exciting growth.”

City of Cleveland Community Development Director Daryl Rush was honored with the inaugural Morton L.Mandel Leadership in Community Development Award.

Other recipients were:

CDC Catalytic Project/Program Award
Fairfax Renaissance Development -- Intergenerational housing

Urban Realtor Award
Keith Brown and Dave Sharkey – Progressive Urban Real Estate

Developer Award
Keith Sutton and Dave Territo, Sutton Builders

Neighborhood Branding & Marketing Award
Downtown Cleveland Alliance – You and Downtown Video

Community Collaboration Award
Gordon Square Arts District (DSCDO, NWT, CPT)

Corporate Partner Award
Third Federal Saving

Travel + Leisure readers rank Cleveland one of America's best food cities

"The rust belt city offers some old-fashioned, even old-world, charms. Readers ranked it at No. 5 for its rich food halls, like West Side Market—with spices, baked goods and delis—which dates back to 1912, when it catered primarily to the city’s immigrants."

Read the full story here.
 

city club ceo asks: can cleveland overcome its race problem?

"As chief executive of the City Club of Cleveland—a 102-year-old institution created to foster dialogue about local, national and international issues—I often find myself in the midst of conversations about the city. So when I—a white guy—am in a meeting about policing or witnessing the inability of some white people here to understand why Tamir’s death catalyzed such vocal and visible protests, I remember what a divided city this really is."

Read the full story here.

country living names cleveland flea one of the 7 best flea markets

"Not your average flea market, this pop-up event serves as a business incubator for small businesses and has helped spur development in the neighborhoods where it's held."

Read the full story here.

healthline cited as model of bold, beautiful bus rapid transit

"Unlike standard bus stops, which are situated along the curb on opposite sides of a street, BRT stations function better in the center. There are practical reasons for this design, the biggest being that it's cheaper to build one nice station per stop than two. But it all comes back to presenting BRT more as a train platform than a bus stand (below, a rendering of a central station in Vientiane, Laos, and a finished one on the HealthLine BRT in Cleveland)."

Read the full story here.

mayor jackson announces plans to introduce $100m bond to city council

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson announced this week that on Monday, December 8th, his administration will be "introducing to Cleveland City Council an ordinance for a $100 million bond as an investment in the future of the City of Cleveland."

The bond, the city stated in a press release, will be used to invest in four areas: roads and bridges, the city’s emergency response fleet, city-owned facilities and new neighborhood projects.

According to the release, the Jackson administration believes it can stimulate investment in neighborhoods beyond those usually cited as examples of success -- such as Ohio City and University Circle -- and especially areas that have not alrady seen recent private development.

"The final $25 million will go towards new city neighborhood projects and investments outside of the city’s central business district," the press release states. "Previous public investments in city neighborhoods have resulted in positive private investment occurring; however, some neighborhoods, in spite of public investments, have not seen equal private investment."

"The City of Cleveland believes that, through focused neighborhood planning and continued investment in the city infrastructure and facilities, the $100 million bond issue will provide essential public capital intended to leverage private investment in neighborhoods where it has been lacking," the press release continues.

Mayor Jackson is quoted as saying: “With this investment, we will not only have better roads, bridges, facilities, vehicles, and recreation centers, but it will also stimulate economic growth, and promote more private investments in the city’s neighborhoods that have the greatest challenges to private investments."

To read the complete press release, click here.

discover cleveland's neighborhoods through cle city life tours

Cleveland Neighborhood Progress has announced that it will be hosting two CLE City Life tours on Saturday, November 29th and Saturday, December 27th.

"Cleveland Neighborhood Progress is pleased to offer citywide bus tours to introduce (or re-introduce) you to some of the coolest and most unique places to live in Northeast Ohio," the website states. "Join us and see why Tremont and Ohio City receive so much publicity. We’ll show you why University Circle is considered the most intellectual square mile in the nation. And you’ll understand why demand is so high for Downtown living options. All this and more!"

The cost is $12. You can register here.

cnn reports on cle heartlab and health-tech corridor

In a CNN Money feature titled “Cleveland: Booming in more ways than Lebron,” Tom Thriveni reports on the work being done at Cleveland Heartlab specifically and the Health-Tech Corridor in general.

“[Jake] Orville is the CEO of five-year-old Cleveland Heartlab, which has licensed several innovations from researchers at nearby -- and world-renowned -- Cleveland Clinic. The partnership was initiated by the clinic as part of its mission to turn its inventions into commercially viable medical products, generating profits for both parties. To date, besides Heartlab, 66 neighboring companies have spun out from Cleveland Clinic ideas since 2000. All told, the clinic has 525 patents and 450 licensing agreements,” Thriveni writes.

“The 1,600-acre Health-Tech Corridor acts as Cleveland's biomedical nerve center, housing three major health-care institutions besides the Cleveland Clinic, four higher education institutions, more than 130 biomedical and other technology companies and eight incubators that lease space and provide consulting and other business development services. This is where the Cleveland Clinic and other partner organizations, such as incubator BioEnterprise, interact with researchers, clinical caregivers, academics and business executives. State-funded groups like Team NEO (for North East Ohio) were launched to help attract new business to the region. Since Cleveland Heartlab opened in the Health-Tech Corridor's first building, eight additional buildings have opened for tenants. A ninth will open soon.”
 
Read the rest here.

university study ranks cities' walkability; cleveland in top 10

In a recently released report by the Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis at George Washington University School of Business in conjunction with Smart Growth America, the 30 largest U.S. cities were ranked by how walkable they are. This is key indicator on how cities are shifting from suburban sprawl to urban infill.

“The researchers, including Leinberger, first looked at Walkscore heat maps, focusing on areas that scored high. They then looked at areas with significant regional importance, meaning they have at least 1.4 million square feet of office space and more than 340,000 square feet of retail space. They combined these factors to determine areas they call "walkable urban places" or WalkUPs.”

But the report doesn’t just evaluate the present; it looks ahead.

“Researchers then tried to predict how these areas would grow in the future by looking at trend lines and pricing premiums in rent space, which indicate demand level. For example, demand around train stations in places like Washington, D.C. is so high commercial and residential renters can pay a premium of between 50 and 80 percent, said Emerick Corsi, president of Cleveland-based Forest City Enterprises Real Estate Services.

Coming in at No. 10 is Cleveland.

“Ohio's largest city hangs on to the bottom spot in the Top 10, but that may change soon. It's set to plummet to No. 24 in the future. Cleveland is one of a handful of older industrial cities where walkability is largely rooted in the past, where a strong city center is walkable while the rest of the surrounding suburban area lacks any kind of walkable urban space.”

Read the rest here.

entrepreneur mag says 'think like cleveland' to boost biz growth

In an Entrepreneur feature titled "Think Like Cleveland: 6 Ingredients to Boosting Business Growth," Jane Porter writes how Cleveland went from being on the bottom of the list in terms of startup-friendly cities to being near the top.
 
"In an Entrepreneur ranking of startup-friendly cities in 2002, Cleveland came in 61 out of 61. At the time, entrepreneurs had little by way of funding options and the startup economy was suffering," writes Porter.
 
But thanks in large part to the formation of Jumpstart, a nonprofit organization focused on helping idea-stage tech companies gain access to funds and resources, things began to turn around -- quickly.
 
The feature goes on to enumerate the six key ingredients that helped propel Cleveland forward, including innovators, advocates and storytellers.
 
Read the entire feature here.
 

#thisiscle promo video goes viral in 3- 2- 1...

On Wednesday, Positively Cleveland, the convention and visitors bureau for Cleveland, announced a new destination brand, presented new plans for its destination development initiatives, unveiled a local social media movement and highlighted a series of organizational accomplishments.
 
But without question, the most buzzed about element of the package was the following video, "A Cleveland Anthem," which promotes the theme: "Cleveland doesn’t follow anyone’s rules – it makes its own."




author, huff post writer tracks progress of 'sustainable cleveland 2019'

Michele Hunt, who attended the 5th annual Summit of Sustainable Cleveland 2019, is tracking the progress of this bold 10-year initiative, which began in 2009. In a feature for Huffington Post titled "Sustainable Cleveland 2019: A Community of DreamMakers Creating a 'A Thriving Green City on a Blue Lake,'" she offers a comprehensive look at the halfway point.
 
"The people of Cleveland are mobilizing around a compelling vision to transform their communities into a flourishing city. They have the courage to dream a magnanimous vision for their city in the face of tremendous challenges," she writes.

"At the Summit, I was surprised to see hundreds of people from diverse sectors of Greater Cleveland working together. They came from the local neighborhoods, businesses, government, education, nonprofits, as well as advocacy groups from the sustainability community. They were highly engaged, enthusiastic and clearly committed to transforming their vision into reality."

These are not merely dreams, she adds, five years into their journey Clevelanders are delivering on their vision. Their results are impressive:

• Last year the 50-member Climate Action Advisory Committee, published the Cleveland Climate Action Plan, which has six focus areas, and 33 actions Clevelanders can take to strengthen the economy, clean up the environment and improve health and wellness.

• There has been a 50 percent increase in recycling since 2006.

• LEEDCO (Lake Erie Energy Development Corporation) is building the first offshore freshwater wind project in North America in Cleveland.

• Over 200 community gardens and local food initiatives have grown up around the city.

• Cleveland is transforming abandoned buildings and vacant lands into green spaces, local parks, urban gardens, as well as restoring homes.

Read the rest of the green news here.


cleveland goes from butt of hollywood jokes to a hub of innovation

In a lengthy feature titled "Hiding Out in Ohio: Bioscience," Tom Thriveni, writing for the digital mag Ozymandias, covers the burgeoning bioscience industry in Cleveland.

"Just as robotics companies in Pittsburgh and high-speed fiber-optic networks in Chattanooga have helped transform the economies of those cities, bioscience entrepreneurship has reshaped Cleveland’s sagging economy," he writes.

"The [Cleveland Heartlab and Cleveland Clinic] partnership was initiated by the clinic as part of its mission to turn its inventions into commercially viable medical products, generating profits for both parties. To date, besides Heartlab, 66 neighboring companies have spun out from Cleveland Clinic ideas since 2000. All told, the clinic has 525 patents and 450 licensing agreements."

Read the rest of the good news here.


cleveland, the next brooklyn, says forbes

In a CNN Money feature titled "The Fortune Crystal Ball," the publication offers up its prognostications for the coming year, among them: Which cities will be the next Brooklyns, and which the next Detroits. Spoiler alert: Cleveland is pegged as a "Brooklyn."
 
"The American geography of prosperity has been driven by two big narratives in the past few years. On the one hand, there's Detroit, with its $18 billion in debt, pension mess, and population loss. On the other, there's Brooklyn, with its rocketing real estate prices, hip-luxe condos, and freshly foraged food stores," notes the money pub.
 
So, just what cities are deemed a "breakout town"?
 
New Brooklyns
 
Cleveland. The city is in the midst of a downtown revival that has seen not one, not two, but three Williamsburg-esque neighborhoods emerge: Tremont, Ohio City, and Gordon Square.
 
Odds of it becoming the "next Brooklyn" are placed at 63%.
 
Read the rest here.

72 MidTown Articles | Page: | Show All
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