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two cleveland eateries make top 15 list of 'most memorable restaurant meals'

Larry Olmsted, the weekly "Great American Bites" restaurant columnist for USA Today, eats out a lot, and his yearly Forbes list of standout restaurant meals from the past 12 months is filled with choice bites from around the globe. Two out of the 15 are meals in Cleveland spots.
 
"One reason these lists remain pertinent is because unlike most food publications, I don’t confuse 'new' with good, and just because I ate someplace this year for the first (or fifth) time doesn’t make the restaurant better or worse. What matters is simply how good the restaurant is," he writes.
 
Red, The Steakhouse
 
"Red succeeds at the high-end steakhouse game – where so many others fail -- by getting four key things right. 1. They make a great steak, using exclusively Certified Angus Beef that is mostly dry aged, and cooking it perfectly. 2. The appetizers are amazing, especially the Oysters Rockefeller and Red House Salad. 3. The classic steakhouse sides are perfected, like creamed corn and the only mac & cheese I have ever had that might actually be too rich, as the four cheese blend includes creamy Swiss raclette – and is offered with or without lobster. 4. The desserts are stunners and the Apple Pie Croissant bread pudding was OMG!"
 
Greenhouse Tavern
 
"Chef-owner Jonathon Sawyer is a hometown hero in Cleveland for his eateries, and if you visit his flagship Greenhouse Tavern it is easy to see why. He does many of the trends that are being embraced from Portland to Brooklyn, but he does them better: he makes an extensive array of his own vinegars, breaks down his own pigs and cows for snout to tail eating and completely embraces local farmers and ingredients. But while many pay lip service to these ideals he lives them, and the food shows. It is fun and wacky fine dining that puts twists on classics from around the world: his lunch menu includes a take on iconic Quebecois poutine called “gravy frites,” which covers a platter of fries with mozzarella curds, veal gravy and sometimes fried eggs. He has gotten a lot of press for his “Properly butchered rib steak,” cut in house of course, but the must-have signatures are the crispy chicken wings confit and roasted pig’s head served with little brioche buns to make your own pig’s head sliders.
 
Check out the entire list here.

new york times travel section checks into new aloft

In a hotel review in the travel section of the New York Times, writer Erik Piepenburg checks into the new Aloft hotel on the East Bank of the Flats and files a glowing review.
 
"The Aloft Downtown gives Cleveland a major boost of bright, colorful and contemporary hotel design in an area -- and a city -- not known for style-centric accommodations," he writes.
 
The article covers the rooms, amenities and available dining options. "A Saturday night meal at Willeyville included delicious vegetarian options for me (grilled sweet corn, baked gnocchi), plenty of meat for a friend and a mind-blowing fried peach pie," he notes.
 
The bottom line, concludes the author, the new Aloft is a "terrific place for design geeks, foodies and fans of rust-belt chic who like their boutique hotel on the industrial side."
 
Read the rest right here.


urban bike mag covers cle's 'guerrilla stripers'

In the latest issue of Urban Velo, a magazine devoted to urban bike culture, writer Joe Baur covers the events leading up to the recent guerrilla striping incident along Detroit Avenue. The photographs in the piece were taken by Fresh Water photographer Bob Perkoski.
 
Because the officially sanctioned 1.7-mile bike lane along Detroit Avenue took a year longer than promised, local bike activists decided to get creative.
 
"The frustration became painfully public for city officials when a group of five 'guerrilla stripers' took it upon themselves to create a bike lane along a highly trafficked thoroughfare for cyclists in the near west side," Baur writes.
 
"Speaking under the condition of anonymity, one of the stripers explains that nobody even attempted to stop them during the hour they spent creating the lane."
 
Read the rest right here.


forbes praises great lakes brewing, ohio city

In a Forbes feature titled “Beer Entrepreneurs Fuel Comeback of Struggling Cleveland Neighborhood,” staff writer Dan Alexander explores the history of Great Lakes Brewing Company and the birth of other small breweries in the area.
 
From humble beginnings to what the Ohio City neighborhood is today, Great Lakes Brewing Company has a lot to do with the area’s revival, the story confirms.
 
"Since 1986 the Conways have bought four buildings in the neighborhood, called Ohio City. They are the beer men who became unlikely leaders of the neighborhood’s revival. In the last decade, other entrepreneurs have joined the Conways in Ohio City. Since 2005, the crime rate in the neighborhood has plummeted 24%, and real estate values have more than doubled."
 
“It was a struggling neighborhood,” adds Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson. “Twenty years later, you go over there, nighttime Friday or Saturday night, it’s going to be packed. Cars can’t move, people just everywhere.”
 
Alexander goes on to detail his meet-up with Sam McNulty, owner of six local establishments in the area. McNulty remains optimistic of the area, with everyone agreeing there is no reason he shouldn’t be.
 
Check out the full piece here.


new study on regionalism comes at ideal time, says next city

In a feature titled "Three Lessons on Regionalism," Bill Bradley, writing for Next City, outlines the findings of a report recently released by Fund for Our Economic Future.
 
"Regionalism, from Paris to Portland, offers cities with closely woven outlying suburbs opportunities to broaden their tax bases, increase minimum wages and develop unified approaches to transit -- which could, in turn, give low-wage workers better access to jobs. Advocates have touted these benefits for years. Now, a new report explores how regional collaboration can help spur economic growth."
 
The Northeast Ohio-based Fund for Our Economic Future, which along with the Knight Foundation, released the report.
 
In sum: "Data is hugely important, investing in groups that find funding can enlarge your pools of grant money, and big thinkers must be instrumental in turning those grand ideas into reality."
 
Read the rest here.


nbc news covers 30th anny of 'a christmas story'

In a light-hearted feature titled, "Oh fudge! Cleveland celebrates 30 years of ‘A Christmas Story,’ NBC News contributor Rob Lovitt outlines the story of the film's popularity and the events surrounding its 30th anniversary.
 
"If you want to experience true fandom, consider a trip to Cleveland this weekend, where several thousand people are expected to gather to celebrate the 30th anniversary of that kitschy classic of holiday cheer and childhood trauma: 'A Christmas Story,'" he writes.
 
Friday and Saturday's anniversary celebration will feature tours, theatrical performances and appearances by cast members, including Ian Petrella (Ralphie’s brother Randy), Scott Schwartz (Flick the flagpole-licker) and Zack Ward (aka, neighborhood bully Scut Farkus).
 
Attendees will also be able to buy signed copies of Tyler Schwartz’ new book, “A Christmas Story Treasury,” attend a charity luncheon and see if they can avoid shooting an eye out with a genuine Red Ryder BB gun and target.
 
All told, Jones expects 4,000 to 5,000 people to attend the weekend festivities, which is certainly a testament to the movie’s continued appeal for both kids and adults.
 
Read all about it here.

museum of contemporary art boasts impressive first-year numbers

In an Art Daily feature titled "MOCA Cleveland releases metrics of strong inaugural year in new building, Uptown," the art publication shares impressive numbers from the museum's first year in its new building.

"In the first year in their new building, MOCA delivered significantly expanded audiences and benefits," says the article.
 
Among them:
 
55,997 visitors took advantage of MOCA’s offerings, up 284 percent from recent years
 
650+ new members, tripling membership in MOCA’s new home
 
The numbers also show how MOCA’s impressive new building at the corner of Mayfield Road and Euclid Avenue acts as a beacon to draw people to University Circle and Uptown.
 
82 percent of MOCA’s visitors are coming to University Circle specifically to visit the Museum
 
70 percent of MOCA’s visitors are eating at a surrounding restaurant
 
24 percent are shopping while in the area
 
Read about the rest here.


recent melt opening featured in columbus dispatch

In a Columbus Dispatch business piece titled “Cleveland grilled-cheese sandwich chain arrives in Short North,” writer Denise Trowbridge highlights Matt Fish’s Melt Bar & Grilled and his decision to test the waters by opening a location in Columbus.
 
“I am nervous, but we had to take the plunge. That’s just part of growing,” Fish was quoted in the piece. “We want to become a regional restaurant group and open a couple more in Columbus, but we have to start with one and make that one the best we can.”
 
Trowbridge goes on to detail many of the aspects we Clevelanders already know and love about Melt, including its signature sandwiches, fabulous beer selection, infamous Melt Challenge, and the 25 percent discount for life for those who add a melt tattoo.
 
Check out the full story here.

heights libraries claim top rating from library journal fifth straight year

For the fifth year in a row, the Cleveland Heights-University Heights Public Library system has received the highest possible rating in the Library Journal’s 2013 Index of Public Library Service. Library Journal is a trade journal that reports news about the library world and has a nation-wide circulation of 100,000.

The five-star rating is given to the top U.S. libraries each year. Heights Libraries has earned five stars in five out of the six years that Library Journal has published the ratings, starting in 2008.

Libraries are rated on four criteria: circulation, visits, program attendance and Internet terminal use (public computers).
“This shows what we’ve known all along: People in our community are using the library regularly,” says Heights Libraries Director Nancy Levin. “For many customers we’ve become that 'third place,' the place besides work and home where they like to be. We are always busy, and I don’t see that trend reversing anytime soon.”

Heights Libraries wasn’t the only other Cuyahoga County area library receiving Star Awards; other area libraries to win are Cleveland Public (4 stars), Cuyahoga County (5 stars), and Lakewood (4 stars).

Read the rest of the report here.

input wanted for design of new convention center hotel

County residents are being asked to share their opinions as they pertain to the new Convention Center Hotel. The 650-room hotel will replace the Cuyahoga County Administrative building at Lakeside Avenue and Ontario Street and serve as the main hotel for the nearby medical mart and convention center.
 
Representatives from the architecture firm Cooper Carry will be in town on Wednesday, November 20th, from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. to share preliminary designs for the new Convention Center Hotel and solicit input from local residents.
 
The hotel is on a fast track, with County Executive Ed FitzGerald stating a goal of a 2016 opening.
 
The meeting is free and open to the public.
 
Cleveland Public Library
Louis Stokes Wing Auditorium
325 Superior Avenue East
 
Questions and registration (not required): info@LAND-studio.org

writer praises city's artist recruitment program

In an International Business Times story titled “Cleveland Is Ready To Rock: Are You?” writer Ellen Killoran shares details of her experience at a recent artist recruitment weekend, during which out-of-town creatives were invited to see a plethora of benefits the city has to offer for artists seeking to relocate.
 
“”Welcome to Cleveland Weekend," which took place in early August, was a self-described experiment spearheaded by the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture, or CPAC, a well-endowed nonprofit dedicated to strengthening Cleveland's artist community," Killoran writes. "The clear objective of the event, the first of its kind, was to persuade these artists from other, often bigger and more expensive cities, to make Cleveland their home base.”
 
Killoran goes on to detail some awe-inspiring features of both the city and the program that should make Cleveland an opportunity too good to pass up.
 
Enjoy the lengthy feature here.


time out chicago loves it some christmas ale

In a Time Out Chicago blurb titled “Drink this now: Great Lakes Brewing Company’s Christmas Ale,” blogger Karl Klockars raves about the liquid gold we Clevelanders know simply as "Crack Ale."
 
“The Christmas Ale is a revered beer in the Rust Belt. Criminals in Cleveland recently broke into the brewery and stole 500 feet of copper wiring, but left the Xmas Ale untouched," Klockars writes. "I choose to believe that this is less an indication of the idiocy of thieves, and more a belief that not even scofflaws would dare touch the Christmas Ale. As such, it’s perfectly okay to crack a few of these open well before the holiday.”
 
Klockars goes on to give a beer nerd’s detailed description of the brew, including this nugget: "This beer sets the bar once again -- as it does most years -- for what a winter warmer beer should be: It’s rich without being overwhelming. It's complex, spicy, savory and subtly sweet. And it's very drinkable."
 
Enjoy the full piece here.


standing ovation for cleveland orchestra performance at lincoln center

In a New York Times review titled "Beethoven and One of France’s Musical Mystics Strive for Glimpses of the Divine," classical music critic James R. Oestreich writes of the Cleveland Orchestra and Franz Welser-Möst's New York performance during Lincoln Center's White Light Festival.
 
"Still, it was the Messiaen performance that will undoubtedly live longest in memory: an imaginative conception expertly realized. A vibrant scrim of sound -- pinging celesta (played by Carolyn Gadiel Warner), virtuosically percussive piano (Joela Jones), eerily swooping ondes Martenot (an early electronic instrument, played by Cynthia Miller) and chiming vibraphone (Marc Damoulakis) -- spanned the front of the stage, an effective foil to all manner of activity behind it."
 
Read the rest of the review here.


fast co. digs into 'world's first biocellar' in east cleveland

In a Fast Co. feature called "Turning A Vacant Cleveland House Into A Fancy Farm," California-based sustainability writer Adele Peters details the plans and construction of the world’s first BioCellar, located in East Cleveland.
 
"The BioCellar, the brainchild of a Cleveland biologist named Jean Loria, will use just the basement of the house -- the rest was torn down -- and will top it with a greenhouse so crops can grow inside. Why a cellar? At depths below four feet, the ground stays at a constant temperature, so even in the middle of a harsh Cleveland winter, the room won't get colder than 50 degrees. With light flooding in from the glass roof above, food can grow year round."
 
Read the rest of the crop report here.


cle's start-up friendly landscape featured in atlantic cities piece

In an Atlantic Cities feature titled "The Passion of Young Cleveland," New York-based writer Nona Willis Aronowitz covers both the start-up friendly nature of Cleveland as well as its political importance.
 
"Cleveland is one of those Rust Belt cities that's too often held up as a symbol of the fall of American industry, but a critical mass of diehard young Clevelanders are either staying or coming back to turn the place around. While I was there, I heard two common reasons why Cleveland natives were staying loyal: It's an ideal place to start a business or a new project, given the low overhead and unusually strong, cohesive community support. But it's also in one of the most politically influential places in the country, in a bellwether, "real America" state that offers young people an opportunity to move the national needle."
 
In the feature, the writer chats with Ohio City developer Graham Veysey and his girlfriend, Marika Shiori-Clark, who says that it's “much easier to be an entrepreneur here. There’s a much lower threshold in terms of risk and price."
 
Read the rest right here.

 
627 Articles | Page: | Show All
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