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Crafting the vision for a greener future at Sustainable Cleveland Summit

More than 500 eco-minded enthusiasts will converge on the Cleveland Public Auditorium this Wednesday 9/27 and Thursday 9/28 for the ninth annual Sustainable Cleveland Summit (presented by the Cleveland Foundation). A keynote by The Nature Conservancy CEO Mark Tercek will put an exciting cap on what’s been dubbed "The Year of Vibrant Green Space,” while the conference will also position 2018 as “The Year of Vibrant Neighborhoods.”

Trending topics at the summit will include implantation of the Cleveland Tree Plan, green jobs, sustainable neighborhood projects, and climate change (and how to combat it via the Cleveland Climate Action Plan). The Cleveland Metroparks will also be providing whirlwind water taxi tours of Cleveland, while the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District will show attendees the green infrastructure in place at Public Square. At the end of each day, a post-Summit reception will offer up ample networking and noshing opportunities. Click here to register or get more 411 on this zero-waste event.

Still in: local organizations vow to honor the Paris Agreement


Mayor Frank G. Jackson is joining the Mayors National Climate Action Agenda, a network of nearly 200 U.S. mayors representing over 50 million Americans in fighting climate change. The group of mayors is working together to strengthen local efforts for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and supporting efforts for binding federal and global-level policymaking.
 
Per a statement from the Mayor's office, climate policy in Washington will not affect plans underway in Cleveland to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050. That goal is part of the Office of Sustainability’s Cleveland Climate Action Plan.
 
“We’re in support of a worldwide climate action plan and we are committed to doing our part here in Cleveland. It is simply the right thing to do,” said Jackson in the statement. “We have a responsibility to leave for future generation a more green, vibrant and healthy Cleveland."

In addition, Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA) and Cleveland State University have both signed the We Are Still In open letter, which states in part:
 
"It is imperative that the world know that in the U.S., the actors that will provide the leadership necessary to meet our Paris commitment are found in city halls, state capitals, colleges and universities, investors and businesses.
 
"Together, we will remain actively engaged with the international community as part of the global effort to hold warming to well below two degrees Celsius and to accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy that will benefit our security, prosperity, and health."
 
CIA President Grafton J. Nunes said of the commitment: “Stewardship of the environment needs to be among our highest callings, and it certainly is a critical challenge for artists and designers," he noted in a statement. "Our faculty emphasizes sustainable solutions with students, although frankly most of our students have grown up with an innate understanding that they were living in an era of a changing climate. But we guide them as they consider what materials and processes they use in their art making. Some of them consider how to use their skills and social agency to improve the environment.
 
“We also model awareness of our environmental impact, through efforts to reduce the impact of our campus facilities,” Nunes added. The school's green efforts include a 300-panel solar array on the roof of the Gund building, a native-species garden atop the Peter B. Lewis Theater and the ongoing replacement of compact fluorescent lighting with high efficiency LED lights in the Gund building.
 
Fresh Water realizes that this list is not likely complete. We apologize if other area organizations have committed to the Paris Agreement. Any omissions are unintentional.
 
The Cleveland Institute of Art is part of Fresh Water's underwriting support network.
 
 

Will drilling expand in Cuyahoga Valley National Park under Trump's plan?

From Annie Knox and Kim Palmer, with additional contributors, for Reuters:

President-elect Donald Trump aims to open up federal lands to more energy development, tapping into a long-running and contentious debate over how best to manage America’s remaining wilderness.


The U.S. government holds title to about 500 million acres of land across the country, including national parks and forests, wildlife refuges and tribal territories stretching from the Arctic to the Gulf of Mexico. They overlay billions of barrels of oil and vast quantities of natural gas, coal, and uranium.

The article goes on to include the Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CVNP) as one federal holding pertinent to the controversy. The CVNP is one of the nation's few parks that already allows drilling on account of privately owned mineral rights.


Per this article by Kabir Bhatia for wksu, however, park officials do not foresee an expansion:

Right now, there are 91 wells within Cuyahoga Valley National Park’s 33,000 acres. Last fall, the rules governing those wells* were overhauled to give the parks more control. Lisa Petit, head of resource management for the park, says she doesn’t foresee new wells being added in the next several years; instead the focus will be bringing the existing wells in-line with the new rules.

The greenspace is a local mecca for hikers, bikers and those who enjoy watersports on the Cuyahoga River. It is Ohio's only national park.

Further reading: 100 miles of the Towpath Trail, one step at a time

*link added

 

Tomorrow around the Metroparks: chickadees, pups and snowflakes

For those wanting to take back control of winter after the recent reminder of what ol' Jack Frost can shovel out, here are three activities to choose from around the Metroparks for tomorrow.

All events are free and open to the public. Follow the links for more information.

Chickadee Feeding Hike, Rocky River Reservation, 10 a.m.

Wild black-capped chickadees can be remarkably friendly. Join a naturalist-led walk for an attempt to lure this gentle creature to your hand. We'll supply the black oil sunflower seed.

Mill Creek Dog Walk, Ohio & Erie Canal Reservation, 10 a.m.

Take a brisk walk with your pup along scenic Mill Creek. Enjoy the flora and fauna as well as hearing a bit of the history of the area. Dogs must be leashed and waste picked up. Walkers without dogs welcome.

Sunday Drop-By: Snowflake Matching, Watershed Stewardship Center at West Creek Reservation, 1 p.m.

Stop by the Watershed Stewardship Center to celebrate this snowy season with a fun game. Bring your friends to this friendly competition while learning about snowflakes. Are snowflakes truly unique?
 

Urban Community School designated as a National Green Ribbon School

Urban Community School (UCS), 4909 Lorain Avenue, has been named the only National Green Ribbon School in the state of Ohio by the U.S. Department of Education, which gives this distinction to select schools, districts, and educational institutions across the country for success in reducing environmental impact and utility cost, improving health and wellness, and ensuring effective environmental education. UCS was recognized for its ongoing efforts to reduce its ecological footprint while promoting active, healthy lifestyles for children and their families.
 
“We commend the faculty, staff, students, and parents of Urban Community School for their efforts in creating a green learning environment and providing leadership to other schools,” said Maureen Dowling, director for the Office of Non-Public Education in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Innovation and Improvement, in a statement.
 
“Urban Community School is honored to receive this distinction from the U.S. Department of Education,” added UCS principal Lisa De Core. “Our school is dedicated to reducing our environmental impact while also incorporating green principles into our pedagogy and teaching our students the importance being green.”
 
De Core cited a number of recent initiatives the school has undertaken that demonstrate its commitment to green, sustainable principals and learning, including:
 
·  Setting up timers on computers and lights to power them down
when not in use
 
·  Installing refillable water bottle stations and water fountains
with filters
 
·  Encouraging students to carry reusable water bottles to avoid
disposal of plastic bottles
 
·  Composting food waste in The Early Childhood wing and recycling
waste throughout the campus
 
·  Using recycled ink cartridges and purchasing 100% recycled
paper products.
 
School representatives will travel to Washington, D.C. in July to receive the award.
 

Rain garden workshop slated for April 2 at Shaker Lakes Nature Center

On Saturday, April 2, from 10 am to noon at the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, 2600 South Park Blvd., the Doan Brook Watershed Partnership and the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes will present "Rain Garden Workshop: How to Earn Stormwater Credits."
 
The timely workshop comes ahead of the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District's plan to begin billing for stormwater this summer. Tori Mills from the Doan Brook Watershed Partnership will explain how impervious areas are measured, how fees are calculated, and give examples of stormwater credit opportunities. Garrett Ormiston from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History will explain where, why and how to construct a rain garden and what native plants work best.
 
For more information and to register online, visit The Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, or call 216-321-5935. The workshop fee is $8 for Nature Center members, $10 for non-members.
 
Get more details here.
 

Registration open for third 4 Miles 4 Water event on May 7 at Edgewater

Drink Local Drink Tap's third 4 Miles 4 Water event will be held on Saturday May 7 from 2 to 10 p.m. at the Cleveland Metroparks' Edgewater Reservation. Activities include a one-mile walk, four-mile run, free "All Things Water" festival with concert, and Guinness World Record Attempt. More than 1,500 participants are expected, including more than 500 registered runners and walkers.

Registration fees vary, but all proceeds will go to Drink Local Drink Tap's mission to preserve our fresh water resources and to have a positive impact on the global water crisis by creating more awareness and reconnecting people with the fresh water resources in their own backyards. Here are links to the participant form and the exhibitor form. There are also sponsorship opportunities.

More information is available here.
 

 

Sustainable Cleveland 2019, Great Lakes Brewery, offer up free happy hour apps, networking

Sustainable Cleveland 2019 invites everyone to be a part of "The Year of Sustainable Transportation" and get involved in some of the organization's 2016 projects on Wednesday, March 16, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at the Great Lakes Brewing Company, 2701 Carroll Avenue. This free public event will feature networking along with free happy hour appetizers and a cash bar.

Attendees are asked to register for the event here.

 

Call for Earth Day Coalition Volunteers

Parties interested in Earth Day Coalition volunteer opportunities are invited to attend a meeting for EarthFest 2016 volunteer orientations. All new volunteers are required to attend one orientation to be assigned a job. Orientations introduce prospective volunteers to the year-round work of the Earth Day Coalition and the EarthFest event, which will be on April 17 at the Cuyahoga County Fairgrounds. All EarthFest volunteers who serve four or more hours are eligible for a free pair of Cleveland Indians tickets through our partnership with Business Volunteers Unlimited. 
 
Upcoming orientations include:
 
Saturday, March 5 from 10:30 a.m. to noon and Saturday, April 2, also from 10:30 a.m. to noon, in the auditorium of the Carnegie West Branch of the Cleveland Public Library, 1900 Fulton Rd.
 
Wednesday, April 6 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Oak Room at 3606 Bridge Avenue.
 
Complete details are available here.

Thrillist: West Side Market is a 'definitive American destination'

"There are great food markets all over America these days, but few are as ingrained in the community (it’s 100+ years old) or as representative of it (some of the same vendors have been there 60 years or more). Cleveland native Phoebe Connell explains in this quote we had to excerpt the bejesus out of because she gave us two pages of loving notes:

'The West Side Market, THE JEWEL OF CLEVELAND. This isn't a farmers market -- it’s a place where everyone's grandmother used to come to get cabbage and a roast for Sunday dinner. Think of it as being in Williamsburg before Williamsburg was fancy: still in the city, but in an actual neighborhood with working class homes.'"

Read the full story here.

Buzzfeed names Cleveland one of 29 cities 20somethings should move to

"It's cheap, their museum is on point, and they have excellent taste in beer." So says Buzzfeed.

Check out what other cities made the list. Read the full story here.

must-read politico story critiques greater university circle initiative

"Today, though, University Circle’s boosters describe a community where felons are getting jobs, hospitals are hiring from the neighborhoods, dilapidated houses are being refurbished and banks are making loans to collectives of the previously unemployed," writes Keith Epstein in this illuminating Politico story. "A 'health technology corridor has given birth to 170 startups, many located in new office space on brownfields cleansed of contamination. 'Uptown' is hot: A new retail and residential real estate development bustles with students, their parents, doctors, and people from the nearby neighborhoods who dine, shop and attend concerts before walking back to their homes."

"The Cleveland program, now entering its 10th year, expands on preexisting models—from recent initiatives in West Philadelphia to a priest’s campaign to empower Basque workers after the Spanish Civil War. It has been in place long enough that it has seen its share of successes and experienced invaluable setbacks that have forced a rethinking of approaches when economic realities didn’t align with the vision. Buffalo, Atlanta, Amarillo and at least a dozen other cities are closely monitoring the program."

Read the full story here.

good magazine on 'the incredible story of chateau hough'

"Chateau Hough, one of the first American vineyards set on reclaimed urban land, was started in 2010 with a $15,000 grant from the city and about $8,000 of Frazier’s own cash. Frazier’s main objectives were to beautify the lot across from his house (hopefully raising its value) and help out parolees, who often have trouble finding work. But he also wanted to see if Cleveland’s most notorious neighborhood could maybe make a pretty damn good wine."

Read the full story here.

country living names cleveland flea one of the 7 best flea markets

"Not your average flea market, this pop-up event serves as a business incubator for small businesses and has helped spur development in the neighborhoods where it's held."

Read the full story here.

uptown district one of five finalists for urban excellence award

"The vibrant redevelopment of a corridor linking art, educational and healthcare institutions with surrounding neighborhoods, creating lively outdoor gathering spaces, retail shops and restaurants, student and market-rate housing, and public transit connections," stated the Bruner Foundation its website.

Read the full list of winners here.
166 Green Articles | Page: | Show All
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