Diversity + Inclusion

Breaking Ground The Madison brothers team -- from left, Bernard, Julian and Robert -- work on a presentation model of the U.S. Embassy in Dakar, Senegal, in the 1960s

Robert P. Madison, man of many architectural, personal triumphs


If any word accurately describes Cleveland, it's diversity. By the late 19th century, 10 percent of the city's population was Irish. Next came the Germans, followed in successive waves by Italians, Poles, Hungarians, Slovenians and Slovakians. Today, the largest growth has been seen in the Asian and Hispanic communities. Cleveland has a history of welcoming the immigrant. Walk into the West Side Market on a busy morning and you might identify a dozen different tongues -- and we don't mean the kinds that come from tasty animals. Diversity is not only what defines a city; it's what makes a city great.