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University Circle : In The News

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Our most popular stories from 2016

A zoomin' fleet of electric go-karts? The next must live neighborhood? What made the RNC such a success? We've got all that – and more.

Click here for a roundup of some of Fresh Water's most popular stories from 2016.

Bon Appetit takes a CLE foodie tour

From Bon Appetit:

“People ask me why I left Portland, and I tell them that Cleveland now is very similar to what Portland was 15 years ago,” said Robert Stockham, general manager at the city’s premiere coffee roaster, Rising Star. Except Cleveland is a city with its own swagger, and a cost of living so low that Stockham said, “You can buy a house for less than a car, and you should never pay full retail price for anything here.” Also: Cleveland is the place for a hipster hotdog hangout that puts Froot Loops on its dogs, a brewery that has residents lining up for Christmas-spiced beer, and one of the world’s best symphony orchestras. Come hungry, and let Stockham be your guide.

Take his whole tour here.

JumpStart, CWRU and St. Clair Superior among grant recipients

Earlier this month, Burton D. Morgan Foundation Trustees approved more than $3.2 million in grants to organizations that promote entrepreneurship in Northeast Ohio. 
 
Beneficiaries include:

St. Clair Superior Development Corporation - $100,000 to develop youth entrepreneurship opportunities that integrate the unique maker culture of the St. Clair Superior neighborhood into Northeast Ohio’s rich entrepreneurship programming (2 years).

JumpStart - $1,000,000 to support the expansion of the Burton D. Morgan Mentoring Program to serve companies in new sectors (3 years).

Case Western Reserve University - $193,381 to support the publication of a book and the design and execution of data collection protocols associated with the Beyond Silicon Valley massive online open course (2 years).

Hawken School - $100,000 to support the development of a digital platform for the Hawken Educators Workshop, and provide scholarships for public school educators in Northeast Ohio to attend the workshop (2 years).

Notre Dame College - $100,000 to support entrepreneurship programming in 2016 and 2017 ($50,000) and to secure and improve program space on campus in 2016 ($50,000).
 
A complete list of grantees is available here.
 

Cleveland insider: Lunch on Fridays at CIA

The Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA), in collaboration with Cuyahoga Arts and Culture is holding a series of free "Lunch on Friday" events, in which CIA invites the public to spend a lunch hour learning about the latest in art and design. Each lecture features a variety of artists and designers from around the world, including CIA faculty and visiting artists. The lectures are from 12:15 – 1:30 p.m. at the Peter B. Lewis Theater at CIA.
 
Notably, there's free pizza.
 
This Friday, Feb. 26, the subject will be "Walking the Talk of Engagement." Come and hear from some of the many CIA faculty members who are connecting their classes to professional engagement beyond the classroom. What are these "engaged practice" classes about? Why are these faculty members interested in this type of teaching? What is the benefit to students?
 
Get all the details and the full speaker line up here.
 

Calabrese advocates for transit funding at Statehouse

Joe Calabrese, CEO and General Manager of the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (RTA) advocated for more transit funding in testimony on Feb. 16 at the Statehouse.

"RTA is the largest public transportation agency in Ohio. My employees, who reside in 16 of Ohio counties, serve approximately 50 million customers each year in Cuyahoga and several neighboring counties," said Calabrese in his address.

"Public transit in Ohio is a $900 million industry that supports many manufacturers, suppliers and jobs.

Public transit gets workers to work, students to school, connects important destinations, drives economic development and provides mobility to many Ohioans who have no other mobility option due to economic realities or disabilities."

Read his comments in their entirety here.
 

Vibrant City Awards attract sold-out crowd, celebrate urban champions

On Tuesday, over 500 guests gathered at the Victory Center in the Health-Tech Corridor for the first-ever Vibrant City awards, hosted by Cleveland Neighborhood Progress.

CNP President Joel Ratner told the crowd, “The facts are there. Data shows that our region is gaining brains and income, our city schools are making terrific improvements, and Cleveland’s population loss is ending. We are headed into an era of exciting growth.”

City of Cleveland Community Development Director Daryl Rush was honored with the inaugural Morton L.Mandel Leadership in Community Development Award.

Other recipients were:

CDC Catalytic Project/Program Award
Fairfax Renaissance Development -- Intergenerational housing

Urban Realtor Award
Keith Brown and Dave Sharkey – Progressive Urban Real Estate

Developer Award
Keith Sutton and Dave Territo, Sutton Builders

Neighborhood Branding & Marketing Award
Downtown Cleveland Alliance – You and Downtown Video

Community Collaboration Award
Gordon Square Arts District (DSCDO, NWT, CPT)

Corporate Partner Award
Third Federal Saving

Buzzfeed names Cleveland one of 29 cities 20somethings should move to

"It's cheap, their museum is on point, and they have excellent taste in beer." So says Buzzfeed.

Check out what other cities made the list. Read the full story here.

Travel + Leisure readers rank Cleveland one of America's best food cities

"The rust belt city offers some old-fashioned, even old-world, charms. Readers ranked it at No. 5 for its rich food halls, like West Side Market—with spices, baked goods and delis—which dates back to 1912, when it catered primarily to the city’s immigrants."

Read the full story here.
 

must-read politico story critiques greater university circle initiative

"Today, though, University Circle’s boosters describe a community where felons are getting jobs, hospitals are hiring from the neighborhoods, dilapidated houses are being refurbished and banks are making loans to collectives of the previously unemployed," writes Keith Epstein in this illuminating Politico story. "A 'health technology corridor has given birth to 170 startups, many located in new office space on brownfields cleansed of contamination. 'Uptown' is hot: A new retail and residential real estate development bustles with students, their parents, doctors, and people from the nearby neighborhoods who dine, shop and attend concerts before walking back to their homes."

"The Cleveland program, now entering its 10th year, expands on preexisting models—from recent initiatives in West Philadelphia to a priest’s campaign to empower Basque workers after the Spanish Civil War. It has been in place long enough that it has seen its share of successes and experienced invaluable setbacks that have forced a rethinking of approaches when economic realities didn’t align with the vision. Buffalo, Atlanta, Amarillo and at least a dozen other cities are closely monitoring the program."

Read the full story here.

city club ceo asks: can cleveland overcome its race problem?

"As chief executive of the City Club of Cleveland—a 102-year-old institution created to foster dialogue about local, national and international issues—I often find myself in the midst of conversations about the city. So when I—a white guy—am in a meeting about policing or witnessing the inability of some white people here to understand why Tamir’s death catalyzed such vocal and visible protests, I remember what a divided city this really is."

Read the full story here.

gay games donated record-high $150k to lgbt funds, report says

Gay Games 9 made history with donations of $120,000 for the Gay Games LGBT Legacy Fund at the Cleveland Foundation and $27,000 for the Gay Community Endowment Fund of Akron Community Foundation.

Final numbers were released this week at the “2014 Gay Games Lessons and Legacies” panel discussion hosted by The City Club. The donations represent the net profit from the Games, making the event the most profitable in the event's history.
 
“The ability to give back to the community is a testament to the Gay Games 9 board’s leadership, which placed importance on operating in a fiscally responsible manner, as well as the tremendous corporate and individual donor support,” said Gay Games 9 Executive Director Tom Nobbe in a statement.
 
Ronn Richard, President and CEO of the Cleveland Foundation, said when the Cleveland Foundation opted to become the first presenting sponsor in Gay Games history, it also made the commitment to launch the Gay Games LGBT Legacy Fund in partnership with GG9. “We’re thrilled the fund is able to launch with such a significant donation from the Games themselves. It’s a great continuation of our century-long commitment to social justice in our community and we’re excited to have the fund grow and make a difference in Greater Cleveland.”

Read the full report here.

uptown district one of five finalists for urban excellence award

"The vibrant redevelopment of a corridor linking art, educational and healthcare institutions with surrounding neighborhoods, creating lively outdoor gathering spaces, retail shops and restaurants, student and market-rate housing, and public transit connections," stated the Bruner Foundation its website.

Read the full list of winners here.

healthline cited as model of bold, beautiful bus rapid transit

"Unlike standard bus stops, which are situated along the curb on opposite sides of a street, BRT stations function better in the center. There are practical reasons for this design, the biggest being that it's cheaper to build one nice station per stop than two. But it all comes back to presenting BRT more as a train platform than a bus stand (below, a rendering of a central station in Vientiane, Laos, and a finished one on the HealthLine BRT in Cleveland)."

Read the full story here.

mayor jackson announces plans to introduce $100m bond to city council

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson announced this week that on Monday, December 8th, his administration will be "introducing to Cleveland City Council an ordinance for a $100 million bond as an investment in the future of the City of Cleveland."

The bond, the city stated in a press release, will be used to invest in four areas: roads and bridges, the city’s emergency response fleet, city-owned facilities and new neighborhood projects.

According to the release, the Jackson administration believes it can stimulate investment in neighborhoods beyond those usually cited as examples of success -- such as Ohio City and University Circle -- and especially areas that have not alrady seen recent private development.

"The final $25 million will go towards new city neighborhood projects and investments outside of the city’s central business district," the press release states. "Previous public investments in city neighborhoods have resulted in positive private investment occurring; however, some neighborhoods, in spite of public investments, have not seen equal private investment."

"The City of Cleveland believes that, through focused neighborhood planning and continued investment in the city infrastructure and facilities, the $100 million bond issue will provide essential public capital intended to leverage private investment in neighborhoods where it has been lacking," the press release continues.

Mayor Jackson is quoted as saying: “With this investment, we will not only have better roads, bridges, facilities, vehicles, and recreation centers, but it will also stimulate economic growth, and promote more private investments in the city’s neighborhoods that have the greatest challenges to private investments."

To read the complete press release, click here.

discover cleveland's neighborhoods through cle city life tours

Cleveland Neighborhood Progress has announced that it will be hosting two CLE City Life tours on Saturday, November 29th and Saturday, December 27th.

"Cleveland Neighborhood Progress is pleased to offer citywide bus tours to introduce (or re-introduce) you to some of the coolest and most unique places to live in Northeast Ohio," the website states. "Join us and see why Tremont and Ohio City receive so much publicity. We’ll show you why University Circle is considered the most intellectual square mile in the nation. And you’ll understand why demand is so high for Downtown living options. All this and more!"

The cost is $12. You can register here.
218 University Circle Articles | Page: | Show All
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