| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter RSS Feed

University Circle : In The News

223 University Circle Articles | Page: | Show All

CIA kicks off its 72nd annual Student Independent Exhibition

Today marks the start of the Cleveland Institute of Art’s 72nd Student Independent Exhibition (SIE). Through March 18, this annual exhibition will be presenting over 100 works of art—from paintings to drawing to ceramics to video—at the Reinberger Gallery. Gallery director Nikki Woods says the exhibition is designed to "remind us of the importance of playful experimentation and the need to take chances, and to question the status quo."  

The jurors for this student-organized exhibition include Chicago artist Claire Ashley, Cincinnati artist and "Shark Girl" creator Casey Riordan Millard, and Athens-based printmaker Art Werger.

The exhibition kicks off tonight with an opening night reception from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Reinberger Gallery (11610 Euclid Ave.). For more information, click here.

 


Redfin names Shaker Heights and University Circle among "Neighborhoods That Have It All"

Redfin recently dropped their list of “25 Neighborhoods That Have it All,” and this year, two Cleveland neighborhoods have made the cut. In a ranking dominated by the Chicago metropolitan area, Shaker Heights and University Circle throw spotlight on Cleveland, weighing in at numbers 16 and 20, respectively.

The online real estate database combed through 80 major U.S. housing markets—ranking neighborhoods based on affordability, home-selling speed, highly rated schools, transit, and low crime rates. While there continues to be a shortage of homes for sale, home prices in the most sought-after markets have skyrocketed. This dilemma has created a surge in movement from pricey, coastal cities to more affordable destinations, putting Shaker Heights and University Circle on the map.

Redfin predicts that this trend will continue throughout 2018, affording all newcomers the chance to see that Cleveland neighborhoods really do have it all.


RTA debuts new "Museum Stops" in University Circle

Raise your hand if you've ever gotten lost driving around University Circle. (Us, too.) If that isn't reason alone to consider taking the RTA's HealthLine on your next trip to Cleveland's cultural epicenter, consider this: the RTA has recently reinvigorated the HealthLine stations in University Circle by adding colorful artwork and depictions of local museums—all in hopes of helping riders more easily find nearby HealthLine stops. The two new "Museum Stops" are located on Euclid Avenue at Stearns Road and Stokes Boulevard, and the HealthLine runs 24/7, seven days a week.

The new developments continue the momentum for the HealthLine, which has seen an annual ridership increase of about 60 percent since its debut in 2008 (as well as a nod as "Best Bus Rapid Transit in North America" from the Institute for Transportation & Development Policy). According to RTA CEO and General Manager Joe Calabrese, "the HealthLine delivered more than $6.3 billion in economic development along Euclid Avenue since it began operation." And now that progress will be just a little bit prettier.

LinkedIn leading the charge to close Cleveland's talent gap in health IT sector

As Ozy put it, "bioscience entrepreneurship has reshaped Cleveland's sagging economy." Yet though the Health-Tech Corridor has certainly become a hotbed for biosience, the struggle to attract health information technology (HIT) employees to the region continues to be real. Luckily, LinkedIn, BioEnterprise, Cleveland State, and other Northeast Ohio agencies are committed to closing that gap—joining forces to provide in-depth analysis and form strategies for fostering local HIT talent.
 
Government Technology had this to say about the initiative:

"One of the critical limiting factors to growth in Northeast Ohio's bioscience industry today is the availability of health IT talent," Aram Nerpouni, BioEnterprise president and CEO, said in a statement. "Thriving health IT companies are hindered by the dearth of software developers and data scientists. The LinkedIn project should provide meaningful data and analysis to inform how we address this challenge."

With the support of the Cleveland Foundation, BioEnterprise launched HIT in the CLE in 2015 to address the lack of available talent in computer and data science. The project is an important tactic within the larger HIT in the CLE talent strategy, the partners said.

LinkedIn will provide Cleveland with information of the skills local employers need, the skills its workers have and the disconnect between the two.

"The city can use those insights to create a stronger IT talent pipeline, and grow its IT industry," said LinkedIn U.S. Head of Policy Nicole Isaac in a statement.


Read the full piece here.

Still in: local organizations vow to honor the Paris Agreement


Mayor Frank G. Jackson is joining the Mayors National Climate Action Agenda, a network of nearly 200 U.S. mayors representing over 50 million Americans in fighting climate change. The group of mayors is working together to strengthen local efforts for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and supporting efforts for binding federal and global-level policymaking.
 
Per a statement from the Mayor's office, climate policy in Washington will not affect plans underway in Cleveland to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050. That goal is part of the Office of Sustainability’s Cleveland Climate Action Plan.
 
“We’re in support of a worldwide climate action plan and we are committed to doing our part here in Cleveland. It is simply the right thing to do,” said Jackson in the statement. “We have a responsibility to leave for future generation a more green, vibrant and healthy Cleveland."

In addition, Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA) and Cleveland State University have both signed the We Are Still In open letter, which states in part:
 
"It is imperative that the world know that in the U.S., the actors that will provide the leadership necessary to meet our Paris commitment are found in city halls, state capitals, colleges and universities, investors and businesses.
 
"Together, we will remain actively engaged with the international community as part of the global effort to hold warming to well below two degrees Celsius and to accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy that will benefit our security, prosperity, and health."
 
CIA President Grafton J. Nunes said of the commitment: “Stewardship of the environment needs to be among our highest callings, and it certainly is a critical challenge for artists and designers," he noted in a statement. "Our faculty emphasizes sustainable solutions with students, although frankly most of our students have grown up with an innate understanding that they were living in an era of a changing climate. But we guide them as they consider what materials and processes they use in their art making. Some of them consider how to use their skills and social agency to improve the environment.
 
“We also model awareness of our environmental impact, through efforts to reduce the impact of our campus facilities,” Nunes added. The school's green efforts include a 300-panel solar array on the roof of the Gund building, a native-species garden atop the Peter B. Lewis Theater and the ongoing replacement of compact fluorescent lighting with high efficiency LED lights in the Gund building.
 
Fresh Water realizes that this list is not likely complete. We apologize if other area organizations have committed to the Paris Agreement. Any omissions are unintentional.
 
The Cleveland Institute of Art is part of Fresh Water's underwriting support network.
 
 

Our most popular stories from 2016

A zoomin' fleet of electric go-karts? The next must live neighborhood? What made the RNC such a success? We've got all that – and more.

Click here for a roundup of some of Fresh Water's most popular stories from 2016.

Bon Appetit takes a CLE foodie tour

From Bon Appetit:

“People ask me why I left Portland, and I tell them that Cleveland now is very similar to what Portland was 15 years ago,” said Robert Stockham, general manager at the city’s premiere coffee roaster, Rising Star. Except Cleveland is a city with its own swagger, and a cost of living so low that Stockham said, “You can buy a house for less than a car, and you should never pay full retail price for anything here.” Also: Cleveland is the place for a hipster hotdog hangout that puts Froot Loops on its dogs, a brewery that has residents lining up for Christmas-spiced beer, and one of the world’s best symphony orchestras. Come hungry, and let Stockham be your guide.

Take his whole tour here.

JumpStart, CWRU and St. Clair Superior among grant recipients

Earlier this month, Burton D. Morgan Foundation Trustees approved more than $3.2 million in grants to organizations that promote entrepreneurship in Northeast Ohio. 
 
Beneficiaries include:

St. Clair Superior Development Corporation - $100,000 to develop youth entrepreneurship opportunities that integrate the unique maker culture of the St. Clair Superior neighborhood into Northeast Ohio’s rich entrepreneurship programming (2 years).

JumpStart - $1,000,000 to support the expansion of the Burton D. Morgan Mentoring Program to serve companies in new sectors (3 years).

Case Western Reserve University - $193,381 to support the publication of a book and the design and execution of data collection protocols associated with the Beyond Silicon Valley massive online open course (2 years).

Hawken School - $100,000 to support the development of a digital platform for the Hawken Educators Workshop, and provide scholarships for public school educators in Northeast Ohio to attend the workshop (2 years).

Notre Dame College - $100,000 to support entrepreneurship programming in 2016 and 2017 ($50,000) and to secure and improve program space on campus in 2016 ($50,000).
 
A complete list of grantees is available here.
 

Cleveland insider: Lunch on Fridays at CIA

The Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA), in collaboration with Cuyahoga Arts and Culture is holding a series of free "Lunch on Friday" events, in which CIA invites the public to spend a lunch hour learning about the latest in art and design. Each lecture features a variety of artists and designers from around the world, including CIA faculty and visiting artists. The lectures are from 12:15 – 1:30 p.m. at the Peter B. Lewis Theater at CIA.
 
Notably, there's free pizza.
 
This Friday, Feb. 26, the subject will be "Walking the Talk of Engagement." Come and hear from some of the many CIA faculty members who are connecting their classes to professional engagement beyond the classroom. What are these "engaged practice" classes about? Why are these faculty members interested in this type of teaching? What is the benefit to students?
 
Get all the details and the full speaker line up here.
 

Calabrese advocates for transit funding at Statehouse

Joe Calabrese, CEO and General Manager of the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (RTA) advocated for more transit funding in testimony on Feb. 16 at the Statehouse.

"RTA is the largest public transportation agency in Ohio. My employees, who reside in 16 of Ohio counties, serve approximately 50 million customers each year in Cuyahoga and several neighboring counties," said Calabrese in his address.

"Public transit in Ohio is a $900 million industry that supports many manufacturers, suppliers and jobs.

Public transit gets workers to work, students to school, connects important destinations, drives economic development and provides mobility to many Ohioans who have no other mobility option due to economic realities or disabilities."

Read his comments in their entirety here.
 

Vibrant City Awards attract sold-out crowd, celebrate urban champions

On Tuesday, over 500 guests gathered at the Victory Center in the Health-Tech Corridor for the first-ever Vibrant City awards, hosted by Cleveland Neighborhood Progress.

CNP President Joel Ratner told the crowd, “The facts are there. Data shows that our region is gaining brains and income, our city schools are making terrific improvements, and Cleveland’s population loss is ending. We are headed into an era of exciting growth.”

City of Cleveland Community Development Director Daryl Rush was honored with the inaugural Morton L.Mandel Leadership in Community Development Award.

Other recipients were:

CDC Catalytic Project/Program Award
Fairfax Renaissance Development -- Intergenerational housing

Urban Realtor Award
Keith Brown and Dave Sharkey – Progressive Urban Real Estate

Developer Award
Keith Sutton and Dave Territo, Sutton Builders

Neighborhood Branding & Marketing Award
Downtown Cleveland Alliance – You and Downtown Video

Community Collaboration Award
Gordon Square Arts District (DSCDO, NWT, CPT)

Corporate Partner Award
Third Federal Saving

Buzzfeed names Cleveland one of 29 cities 20somethings should move to

"It's cheap, their museum is on point, and they have excellent taste in beer." So says Buzzfeed.

Check out what other cities made the list. Read the full story here.

Travel + Leisure readers rank Cleveland one of America's best food cities

"The rust belt city offers some old-fashioned, even old-world, charms. Readers ranked it at No. 5 for its rich food halls, like West Side Market—with spices, baked goods and delis—which dates back to 1912, when it catered primarily to the city’s immigrants."

Read the full story here.
 

must-read politico story critiques greater university circle initiative

"Today, though, University Circle’s boosters describe a community where felons are getting jobs, hospitals are hiring from the neighborhoods, dilapidated houses are being refurbished and banks are making loans to collectives of the previously unemployed," writes Keith Epstein in this illuminating Politico story. "A 'health technology corridor has given birth to 170 startups, many located in new office space on brownfields cleansed of contamination. 'Uptown' is hot: A new retail and residential real estate development bustles with students, their parents, doctors, and people from the nearby neighborhoods who dine, shop and attend concerts before walking back to their homes."

"The Cleveland program, now entering its 10th year, expands on preexisting models—from recent initiatives in West Philadelphia to a priest’s campaign to empower Basque workers after the Spanish Civil War. It has been in place long enough that it has seen its share of successes and experienced invaluable setbacks that have forced a rethinking of approaches when economic realities didn’t align with the vision. Buffalo, Atlanta, Amarillo and at least a dozen other cities are closely monitoring the program."

Read the full story here.

city club ceo asks: can cleveland overcome its race problem?

"As chief executive of the City Club of Cleveland—a 102-year-old institution created to foster dialogue about local, national and international issues—I often find myself in the midst of conversations about the city. So when I—a white guy—am in a meeting about policing or witnessing the inability of some white people here to understand why Tamir’s death catalyzed such vocal and visible protests, I remember what a divided city this really is."

Read the full story here.
223 University Circle Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts