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Shaker Heights : In The News

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Residents of Lee Harvard invited to share their stories for posterity

Cleveland's Lee Harvard neighborhood has a rich heritage, and the Cleveland Restoration Society's "Shining a Spotlight on Lee Harvard: Telling Our Story" event will give it a resounding voice. Set for this Sunday, October 29, the event will feature residents and former residents sharing their experiences of living and growing up in the Ward 1 area—specifically the historic Arthur Bussey neighborhood off Lee Road (where a number of houses are still inhabited by their original owners).

This live storytelling event coincides with CRS' effort to nominate the Arthur Bussey neighborhood for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.
 Residents will be led in telling their stories by Dr. Todd M. Michney, Ph.D., whose book Surrogate Suburbs: Black Upward Mobility and Neighborhood Change in Cleveland 1900-1980 explores the ways that African Americans built strong neighborhoods in the face of discrimination. Stories shared will be archived as part of the Cleveland Memory Project and the Cleveland Public Library Digital Collection.

The event takes place this Sunday from 3-4:30 p.m. at Lee Road Baptist Church. Register for this unique gathering here, or call Stephanie Allen at 216-426-3106 for more information. 

Our most popular stories from 2016

A zoomin' fleet of electric go-karts? The next must live neighborhood? What made the RNC such a success? We've got all that – and more.

Click here for a roundup of some of Fresh Water's most popular stories from 2016.

Rain garden workshop slated for April 2 at Shaker Lakes Nature Center

On Saturday, April 2, from 10 am to noon at the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, 2600 South Park Blvd., the Doan Brook Watershed Partnership and the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes will present "Rain Garden Workshop: How to Earn Stormwater Credits."
 
The timely workshop comes ahead of the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District's plan to begin billing for stormwater this summer. Tori Mills from the Doan Brook Watershed Partnership will explain how impervious areas are measured, how fees are calculated, and give examples of stormwater credit opportunities. Garrett Ormiston from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History will explain where, why and how to construct a rain garden and what native plants work best.
 
For more information and to register online, visit The Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, or call 216-321-5935. The workshop fee is $8 for Nature Center members, $10 for non-members.
 
Get more details here.
 

Shaker Historical Society to feature work of Leslye Arian

The Jack and Linda Lissauer Gallery at the Shaker Historical Society (SHS), 16740 South Park Blvd., will display the work of Leslye Arian via her show “Pushing Paint,” which will be on display from March 25 through May 15.
 
The opening reception will be held at SHS on April 8 from 6 to 8 p.m. Arian will be in attendance. This event is free and open to the public, but attendees are asked to make a reservation by calling 216-921-1201.
 
Arian currently serves on the Cleveland Institute of Art's alumni board and in 2015, she initiated the Pocket Park Public Art Project and the Shaker Community Gallery Project in Shaker Heights.
 
Get more details on Arian and the forthcoming show here.

Calabrese advocates for transit funding at Statehouse

Joe Calabrese, CEO and General Manager of the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (RTA) advocated for more transit funding in testimony on Feb. 16 at the Statehouse.

"RTA is the largest public transportation agency in Ohio. My employees, who reside in 16 of Ohio counties, serve approximately 50 million customers each year in Cuyahoga and several neighboring counties," said Calabrese in his address.

"Public transit in Ohio is a $900 million industry that supports many manufacturers, suppliers and jobs.

Public transit gets workers to work, students to school, connects important destinations, drives economic development and provides mobility to many Ohioans who have no other mobility option due to economic realities or disabilities."

Read his comments in their entirety here.
 

Travel + Leisure readers rank Cleveland one of America's best food cities

"The rust belt city offers some old-fashioned, even old-world, charms. Readers ranked it at No. 5 for its rich food halls, like West Side Market—with spices, baked goods and delis—which dates back to 1912, when it catered primarily to the city’s immigrants."

Read the full story here.
 

city club ceo asks: can cleveland overcome its race problem?

"As chief executive of the City Club of Cleveland—a 102-year-old institution created to foster dialogue about local, national and international issues—I often find myself in the midst of conversations about the city. So when I—a white guy—am in a meeting about policing or witnessing the inability of some white people here to understand why Tamir’s death catalyzed such vocal and visible protests, I remember what a divided city this really is."

Read the full story here.

discover cleveland's neighborhoods through cle city life tours

Cleveland Neighborhood Progress has announced that it will be hosting two CLE City Life tours on Saturday, November 29th and Saturday, December 27th.

"Cleveland Neighborhood Progress is pleased to offer citywide bus tours to introduce (or re-introduce) you to some of the coolest and most unique places to live in Northeast Ohio," the website states. "Join us and see why Tremont and Ohio City receive so much publicity. We’ll show you why University Circle is considered the most intellectual square mile in the nation. And you’ll understand why demand is so high for Downtown living options. All this and more!"

The cost is $12. You can register here.

larchmere merchants celebrate completion of streetscape with 'unblock the street' party

Anytime orange barrels get rolled away, it's a cause for celebration, right? The merchants on Larchmere certainly think so. After a summer filled with jackhammers, construction workers and blocked-off streets, they're finally ready to celebrate the completion of a new $3m streetscape.

That's why they're holding an "UnBlock the Street" party on Thursday, November 6th from 3-7 p.m. According to the press release, merchants, residents, artists, ODOT, Perk Construction and Mayor Frank Jackson will be on hand to celebrate.

"This $3m project includes a newly paved asphalt road, refurbished storm sewer basins, curbs and sidewalks, permeable paver and logo sidewalk bricks, new honey locust trees, benches, trash cans, and colorful chair-back-styled bike racks designed by Tom Hubbard," says Harriett Logan of Loganberry Books in the release. "The street is looking good! We’ll have music with a live DJ, nibbles, raffles, face painting, and community camaraderie.  Come celebrate with us!"

The ribbon cutting and formal ceremony takes place at Larchmere and East 127th at 4 p.m. There will be kids activities and free hot dogs at Shaker Quality Auto body (12916 Larchmere) from 3-7 p.m. For those who want to keep on celebrating, the after-party is at Felice (12502 Larchmere) beginning at 7 p.m.
 

lebron in the bag, cleveland now seeking mvp entrepreneurs

An item in the Huffington Post titled “They've Got LeBron, But Now Cleveland Seeks MVP Entrepreneurs,” writer Daryl Rowland outlines the hard work being done at Shaker LaunchHouse to attract other types of talent to the region.
 
"Where Los Angeles can be said to be about beauty and fame, or New York about ambition or talent, Northeast Ohio has a long history of manufacturing and celebrating the excellence and hard work required to make or do things well," Rowland writes.
 
Shaker LaunchHouse hopes to build upon the strong and growing biomedical products and business services technology industry by growing a hub for technology hardware.
 
“While many parts of the country are trying to attract tech startups, LaunchHouse, a business accelerator in Shaker Heights… is among the first to focus its efforts on tech hardware and interface technology.”
 
"With its rich history in manufacturing, Cleveland has become the perfect place for the intersection of technology and hardware," Todd Goldstein, CEO and managing partner at LaunchHouse is quoted in the piece. "We're encouraging the undiscovered MVPs of manufacturing to be like LeBron and set up shop in Northeast Ohio -- where we know how to build and distribute manufactured goods."
 
LaunchHouse has a track record for launching successful startups, with investment in 51 companies that have raised more than $15.5 million in follow-on funding and created more than 70 jobs in Northeast Ohio.
 
Read the rest right here.
 

university study ranks cities' walkability; cleveland in top 10

In a recently released report by the Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis at George Washington University School of Business in conjunction with Smart Growth America, the 30 largest U.S. cities were ranked by how walkable they are. This is key indicator on how cities are shifting from suburban sprawl to urban infill.

“The researchers, including Leinberger, first looked at Walkscore heat maps, focusing on areas that scored high. They then looked at areas with significant regional importance, meaning they have at least 1.4 million square feet of office space and more than 340,000 square feet of retail space. They combined these factors to determine areas they call "walkable urban places" or WalkUPs.”

But the report doesn’t just evaluate the present; it looks ahead.

“Researchers then tried to predict how these areas would grow in the future by looking at trend lines and pricing premiums in rent space, which indicate demand level. For example, demand around train stations in places like Washington, D.C. is so high commercial and residential renters can pay a premium of between 50 and 80 percent, said Emerick Corsi, president of Cleveland-based Forest City Enterprises Real Estate Services.

Coming in at No. 10 is Cleveland.

“Ohio's largest city hangs on to the bottom spot in the Top 10, but that may change soon. It's set to plummet to No. 24 in the future. Cleveland is one of a handful of older industrial cities where walkability is largely rooted in the past, where a strong city center is walkable while the rest of the surrounding suburban area lacks any kind of walkable urban space.”

Read the rest here.

#thisiscle promo video goes viral in 3- 2- 1...

On Wednesday, Positively Cleveland, the convention and visitors bureau for Cleveland, announced a new destination brand, presented new plans for its destination development initiatives, unveiled a local social media movement and highlighted a series of organizational accomplishments.
 
But without question, the most buzzed about element of the package was the following video, "A Cleveland Anthem," which promotes the theme: "Cleveland doesn’t follow anyone’s rules – it makes its own."




new study on regionalism comes at ideal time, says next city

In a feature titled "Three Lessons on Regionalism," Bill Bradley, writing for Next City, outlines the findings of a report recently released by Fund for Our Economic Future.
 
"Regionalism, from Paris to Portland, offers cities with closely woven outlying suburbs opportunities to broaden their tax bases, increase minimum wages and develop unified approaches to transit -- which could, in turn, give low-wage workers better access to jobs. Advocates have touted these benefits for years. Now, a new report explores how regional collaboration can help spur economic growth."
 
The Northeast Ohio-based Fund for Our Economic Future, which along with the Knight Foundation, released the report.
 
In sum: "Data is hugely important, investing in groups that find funding can enlarge your pools of grant money, and big thinkers must be instrumental in turning those grand ideas into reality."
 
Read the rest here.


d.c. streets covers major policy shift at local planning agency

In a DC Streets Blog post titled "In Cleveland, An Old-School Planning Agency Sees the Light," writer Angie Schmitt writes of the dramatic turn around currently talking place at Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency (NOACA), a topic Fresh Water recently covered in depth.
 
"NOACA was so notoriously averse to change and ineffectual that it acquired the nickname NO ACTION," Schmitt writes. "But as impossible as it seemed even a year ago, things are changing at NOACA. They’re changing fast, and for the better. Last year the agency hired a new director, Grace Gallucci, who had been the head of finance for the Chicago Transit Authority. Since the Cleveland native assumed her role at the head of the NOACA, the region agency has adopted a completely different tenor."

Read more about how the local planning agency is shifting gears here.


ny times gives ink to new rust belt mag 'belt'

In a New York Times Arts Beat post titled “New Magazine Celebrates ‘Rust Belt Chic,’ With a Wink,” writer Jennifer Schuessler details her conversation with Belt magazine editor Anne Trubek about a new publication dedicated to fostering a new journalistic beat in Cleveland.
 
"The decaying cities of the post-industrial Midwest can sometimes seem like a museum of things America used to make: cars, refrigerators, steel, televisions. But if a start-up in Cleveland gets its way, the region may help rebuild the market for another endangered product -- long-form magazine journalism," Schuessler writes.
The magazine offers up a collection of essays and reporting that seeks to explore the regional identity that is known as the Rust Belt.
 
“I cringe at words like ‘authentic,’” Trubek says in the article. “But the rust belt aesthetic isn’t about the ephemeral global economy, it’s about boots on the ground and things hidden in grandma’s attic. We want to explore that.”
 
Check out the full interview here.

29 Shaker Heights Articles | Page: | Show All
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