| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter RSS Feed

Ohio City : In The News

123 Ohio City Articles | Page: | Show All

cle named by mag as one of nation's 'best up-and-coming nightlife cities'

Women's Health magazine teamed up with Yelp to find the “fittest, artsiest, foodiest, and just plain coolest cities on the rise in America.” The results of their research landed them this list: Social Climbers: 5 Best Up-and-Coming Nightlife Cities. Cleveland is among the best.

“For our first ever Social Cities package in the October 2014 issue of Women's Health, we teamed up with data scientists at Yelp to help us find the best (and most surprising) cities across America for different types of social scenes. For cities to rank high for nightlife, we looked at bars of all types --champagne bars, dive bars, gay bars, hookah bars, Irish pubs, sports bars, wine bars... you name it! We also looked for cities with a ton of dance clubs, night clubs, a solid karaoke scene, pool halls... and so much more. The five fantastic cities that we named our top up-and-coming nightlife hotspots had a LOT of all of the above on offer. If you're looking for a seriously fun road trip with your closest girlfriends, you should definitely add any of these bumping cities to your must-visit list.”

2. Cleveland, OH

“Sure, Cleveland has always rocked. Now, thanks to three reinvigorated neighborhoods, the city's nightlife pulses with a new sophistication. We're not talking cookie-cutter poshness: The after-dark ambience in these trendsetting locales are decidedly diverse.”

Mentioned in the item are the Horseshoe Casino, Ohio City's West 25th Street, Uptown, Cleveland Orchestra's Severance Hall, Cleveland Heights and The Grog Shop.
 
Read the rest right here.
 

new york times takes a shine to cleveland's reuse policies

In the Travel section of the New York Times, writer Peter Larson details the robust reuse approach to development taking place in Cleveland. Titled “Cleveland, a City Repurposed,” the article describes various projects in the city that made use of vacant historic structures.

“If there had to be a slogan to describe Cleveland as it is today, ‘what’s old is new again’ would undoubtedly be it,” Larson writes. “In the last few years, locals and businesses in this Midwest metropolis have been repurposing historic buildings from its heyday in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and turning them into restaurants, stores and draws for both residents and tourists. Many of these structures had sat empty for a decade or more before restoration efforts began infusing a vibrancy into this once-somewhat-downtrodden city.”

Examples given include Cowell & Hubbard, Zack Bruell’s upscale French restaurant that opened in a former jewelry boutique of the same name. The Horseshoe Casino, which now occupies the first four floors of the former Higbee’s department store. Ohio City’s Transformer Station, which was built in 1924 as a power-converter station for the local streetcar line. And the Greater Cleveland Aquarium, also built in a defunct power station.

Read the rest right here.

university study ranks cities' walkability; cleveland in top 10

In a recently released report by the Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis at George Washington University School of Business in conjunction with Smart Growth America, the 30 largest U.S. cities were ranked by how walkable they are. This is key indicator on how cities are shifting from suburban sprawl to urban infill.

“The researchers, including Leinberger, first looked at Walkscore heat maps, focusing on areas that scored high. They then looked at areas with significant regional importance, meaning they have at least 1.4 million square feet of office space and more than 340,000 square feet of retail space. They combined these factors to determine areas they call "walkable urban places" or WalkUPs.”

But the report doesn’t just evaluate the present; it looks ahead.

“Researchers then tried to predict how these areas would grow in the future by looking at trend lines and pricing premiums in rent space, which indicate demand level. For example, demand around train stations in places like Washington, D.C. is so high commercial and residential renters can pay a premium of between 50 and 80 percent, said Emerick Corsi, president of Cleveland-based Forest City Enterprises Real Estate Services.

Coming in at No. 10 is Cleveland.

“Ohio's largest city hangs on to the bottom spot in the Top 10, but that may change soon. It's set to plummet to No. 24 in the future. Cleveland is one of a handful of older industrial cities where walkability is largely rooted in the past, where a strong city center is walkable while the rest of the surrounding suburban area lacks any kind of walkable urban space.”

Read the rest here.

time out calls cleveland 'a road trip for food lovers'

In a Time Out Chicago feature titled, “Road trips for food-lovers: Cleveland,” writer Rebecca Skoch offer road-trippers a quick weekend itinerary for food-focused visitors to our fair city.

“With a mix of old school restaurants and ambitious chefs, the Ohio city is an up-and-coming culinary destination,” she writes.
“Cleveland's restaurant and bar scene has been gaining momentum over the past few years. Celebrity chefs like Michael Symon of Lola and Lolita have taken the lead in championing local dining, and long-standing favorites are finally gaining the recognition they deserve.”

“Here are a few places not to miss during a summer weekend on the shores of Lake Erie.”

Among the places highlighted in the piece are Flying Fig, West Side Market, Sokolowski's, Greenhouse Tavern and Porco Lounge.
 
Read the rest here.
 

as cleveland goes: how the local craft beer scene is shaping up

This is the first of a three-part series written by Columbus-based Kyle Kastranec that chronicles the state of craft beer in Ohio, and how it could lend insight into national trends and future growth for the entire industry. He begins with Cleveland.
 
"Over the last few years, a new wave of breweries has been reshaping the craft beer landscape along the shores of Lake Erie," he writes. "It's not the most mature market in the country; it's not even the most mature market in the region. But Cleveland, with its fleet of fledgling and developing breweries, is becoming a bellwether for national trends and craft beer's narrative arc across the country."
 
Kastranec writes how beer and breweries directly affect the local economy and the revitalization of neighborhoods.
 
"[Andy] Tveekrem returned to Cleveland in 2010 and partnered with a local entrepreneur, Sam McNulty, to launch Market Garden Brewery, a venture that kick-started the transformation and revitalization of West 25th Street and the entire Ohio City neighborhood. "When we opened, there was about 75% vacancy on West 25th between these three blocks," Tveekrem says. "Now it's zero."
 
Of course, Great Lakes Brewing played a major role in launching the craft beer scene in Cleveland and Ohio. "But more than that, the GLBC history has shaped the very fabric of the local brewing community. Everyone is connected, and all roads lead back to Great Lakes, whose culture and attention to detail has prepared the current generation of brewers to innovate, to adapt, to grow, to anticipate market demands, and most importantly, to ensure quality through it all."
 
Read the rest of this great beer feature here.
 
 

crop bistro included in listing of cool restaurants in converted spaces

In a Thrillist feature titled, "Drinking in Banks and Jails: 21 Restaurants/Bars Converted from Very Different Buildings, Crop Bistro in Ohio City earns a spot.
 
"We've all been in a Thai restaurant that was obviously once a Pizza Hut, but even the ghost of a stuffed-crust pizza haunting your pad Thai has nothing on a cool, old building that's been converted to a place where you can stuff your face or give your liver a workout," writes Andy Kryza. "From an old elementary school to a jail and an airplane, these 21 joints keep their historical roots while also keeping you fat and happy."
 
Crop Bar and Bistro
Cleveland, OH
 
What it was: A gigantic 1925 bank, complete with marble columns, huge arches, and 17,000 feet of floor space.
 
What it is now: "One of Ohio's most-lauded restaurants, Crop has kept the integrity of the space intact -- from the remastered columns to the gigantic murals over the bar -- while cooking up high-end cuisine in an open kitchen set up right in the middle of the packed floor. In the basement, meanwhile, you can rent out the vault space, which is great for parties or, in the event of a zombie apocalypse, survival."
 
Read the rest of the listacle here.


cleveland selected as one of nation's most underrated food cities

Thrillist, the digital magazine for men, recently published a feature on the "The 7 most underrated food cities in America." Writer Dan Gentile included Cleveland in the listing.
 
"What makes a great food city isn't necessarily Michelin stars or food trucks per capita," he writes. "While NYC, LA, and Chicago have always shined brightest, and upstarts like Austin and Portland might be the kings of meals on wheels, there are a ton of cities out there where tradition and innovation mix into unique melting pots... full of melting food."
 
To compile the list, the writer reached out to community experts to state why their cities are considered underrated, and what spots you should be sure to try when you visit. For the Cleveland entry, that honor fell to Sam McNulty of Market Garden Brewery.
 
"Cleveland has been punching very far above its weight in the food and craft beer scene in recent years," McNulty states. "Having traveled all over the world and been a food and beer tourist on most continents, I am still thrilled when the plane touches down here in Cleveland, and I'm back in this Mecca of local food and local beer."
 
"Forbes magazine just wrote a piece about Cleveland being the new Brooklyn. And while they meant it as a compliment, we're actually much more a new Cleveland with our own authentic and edgy flavor."
 
Read the rest right here.


#thisiscle promo video goes viral in 3- 2- 1...

On Wednesday, Positively Cleveland, the convention and visitors bureau for Cleveland, announced a new destination brand, presented new plans for its destination development initiatives, unveiled a local social media movement and highlighted a series of organizational accomplishments.
 
But without question, the most buzzed about element of the package was the following video, "A Cleveland Anthem," which promotes the theme: "Cleveland doesn’t follow anyone’s rules – it makes its own."




ceo of breakthrough schools testified to u.s. house on education reform

On March 12, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, chaired by Rep. John Kline (R-MN), held a hearing entitled, “Raising the Bar: The Role of Charter Schools in K-12 Education.” During the hearing, members discussed ways charter schools are empowering parents, pioneering fresh teaching methods, encouraging state and local innovation, and helping students escape underperforming schools.
 
Alan Rosskamm, CEO of Breakthrough Schools in Cleveland, described Breakthrough’s success in raising the bar on student achievement.
 
“In 2012-2013, Breakthrough students, on average, outperformed their peers across the city, county, and state in every subject,” Rosskamm said. “Nationally, Breakthrough Schools were recognized as 1st in reading growth and 4th in math growth among urban charter school networks in the United States in a study by the CREDO Institute at Stanford University.”
 
Mr. Rosskamm’s remarks underscore the unique relationship that Breakthrough Schools has with the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. The district sponsors eight of Breakthrough’s 10 schools, including Lakeshore Intergenerational School, which will open in Collinwood this August. Four of Breakthrough’s schools are housed in former district buildings and a fifth, Near West Intergenerational School, is in space leased from the district for $1 a year. 

“Half of Cleveland’s top performing schools are public charter schools,” John Zitzner, President of Friends of Breakthrough School, added in a release. “Replicating high performing charters like Breakthrough Schools is critical to turning Cleveland into a championship city for education.”

Read more about the hearing here.


pittsburgh post-gazette writer 'gets market buzz in cleveland'

In a feature titled, "Getting a Market Buzz in Cleveland," Pittsburgh Post-Gazette writer Diana Nelson Jones compares the West Side Market to her city's eclectic Strip District, as that city plots a course for a grand future marketplace of its own.
 
"Except for the selection of dried beans at Urban Herbs, the West Side Market in Cleveland doesn’t sell anything you can’t find in Pittsburgh’s Strip District. What they have that we don’t have is a grand work of marketplace architecture," she writes.
 
She adds that "the trip prompted many thoughts about what we have and don’t have and led to a rumination on the potential of the Pittsburgh Public Market and the Terminal Building on Smallman Street to be long-term additions to the scene."
 
"As I toured the West Side Market, I caught myself oohing and aahing, wondering why at first and then realizing why -- the intensity of consolidation. It is Wholey’s, Penn Mac, Stamolis, Parma Sausage, Sam Bok, Stan’s, Labad’s, La Prima and every farmers’ market all together in one big teeming, gleaming -- and at times overwhelming -- place."
 
"But the certainty I came away with from Cleveland was that a great city needs a great indoor market scene and any city that still has its old-world market house is blessed, lucky, farsighted or all three."
 
Read the rest of the story here.
 

brite winter fest previewed in indy star

In an article titled "Cleveland embraces cold with Brite Winter Festival of music, art," Indy Star Correspondent Ashley Petry features a preview of this weekend's Brite Winter Festival, to be held in Ohio City.
 
"All winter, Cleveland residents endure cold temperatures and lake-effect snow, but that doesn’t mean they stay cooped up inside."
 
"Instead, the city celebrates blustery weather at the annual Brite Winter Festival. Now in its fifth year, the outdoor event features live music, art installations and carnival games -- along with gallons of free hot chocolate."

"On Saturday, Feb. 15, more than 20,000 people are expected to pack the hip Ohio City neighborhood. The schedule includes more than 70 performances by local, regional and national bands, who will perform on 10 stages, including four outdoor stages."
 
“There are fires outside, outdoor beer gardens and food trucks, and it’s just a magical scene,” said Thomas Fox, the festival’s director of programming and marketing. “It was 19 degrees and a blizzard last year, and we doubled the attendance.”

Read the rest here.


cleveland, the next brooklyn, says forbes

In a CNN Money feature titled "The Fortune Crystal Ball," the publication offers up its prognostications for the coming year, among them: Which cities will be the next Brooklyns, and which the next Detroits. Spoiler alert: Cleveland is pegged as a "Brooklyn."
 
"The American geography of prosperity has been driven by two big narratives in the past few years. On the one hand, there's Detroit, with its $18 billion in debt, pension mess, and population loss. On the other, there's Brooklyn, with its rocketing real estate prices, hip-luxe condos, and freshly foraged food stores," notes the money pub.
 
So, just what cities are deemed a "breakout town"?
 
New Brooklyns
 
Cleveland. The city is in the midst of a downtown revival that has seen not one, not two, but three Williamsburg-esque neighborhoods emerge: Tremont, Ohio City, and Gordon Square.
 
Odds of it becoming the "next Brooklyn" are placed at 63%.
 
Read the rest here.


urban bike mag covers cle's 'guerrilla stripers'

In the latest issue of Urban Velo, a magazine devoted to urban bike culture, writer Joe Baur covers the events leading up to the recent guerrilla striping incident along Detroit Avenue. The photographs in the piece were taken by Fresh Water photographer Bob Perkoski.
 
Because the officially sanctioned 1.7-mile bike lane along Detroit Avenue took a year longer than promised, local bike activists decided to get creative.
 
"The frustration became painfully public for city officials when a group of five 'guerrilla stripers' took it upon themselves to create a bike lane along a highly trafficked thoroughfare for cyclists in the near west side," Baur writes.
 
"Speaking under the condition of anonymity, one of the stripers explains that nobody even attempted to stop them during the hour they spent creating the lane."
 
Read the rest right here.


forbes praises great lakes brewing, ohio city

In a Forbes feature titled “Beer Entrepreneurs Fuel Comeback of Struggling Cleveland Neighborhood,” staff writer Dan Alexander explores the history of Great Lakes Brewing Company and the birth of other small breweries in the area.
 
From humble beginnings to what the Ohio City neighborhood is today, Great Lakes Brewing Company has a lot to do with the area’s revival, the story confirms.
 
"Since 1986 the Conways have bought four buildings in the neighborhood, called Ohio City. They are the beer men who became unlikely leaders of the neighborhood’s revival. In the last decade, other entrepreneurs have joined the Conways in Ohio City. Since 2005, the crime rate in the neighborhood has plummeted 24%, and real estate values have more than doubled."
 
“It was a struggling neighborhood,” adds Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson. “Twenty years later, you go over there, nighttime Friday or Saturday night, it’s going to be packed. Cars can’t move, people just everywhere.”
 
Alexander goes on to detail his meet-up with Sam McNulty, owner of six local establishments in the area. McNulty remains optimistic of the area, with everyone agreeing there is no reason he shouldn’t be.
 
Check out the full piece here.


new study on regionalism comes at ideal time, says next city

In a feature titled "Three Lessons on Regionalism," Bill Bradley, writing for Next City, outlines the findings of a report recently released by Fund for Our Economic Future.
 
"Regionalism, from Paris to Portland, offers cities with closely woven outlying suburbs opportunities to broaden their tax bases, increase minimum wages and develop unified approaches to transit -- which could, in turn, give low-wage workers better access to jobs. Advocates have touted these benefits for years. Now, a new report explores how regional collaboration can help spur economic growth."
 
The Northeast Ohio-based Fund for Our Economic Future, which along with the Knight Foundation, released the report.
 
In sum: "Data is hugely important, investing in groups that find funding can enlarge your pools of grant money, and big thinkers must be instrumental in turning those grand ideas into reality."
 
Read the rest here.

123 Ohio City Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts