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Raise a glass to the seven local recipients of Wine Spectator's 2017 Restaurant Awards

Wondering where to sip in style? The new class of Wine Spectator's 2017 Restaurant Awards recipients might be a great place to start. The magazine's annual awards celebrate the world's best wine lists, and this year, seven Cleveland restaurants made the discerning cut. Among the local honorees are Lola, Bold Food & Drink, Dante, Pier W, L'Albatros, Edwin's Restaurant, and Morton's, the Steakhouse. The full list of winners can be viewed here. Viva la vino!
 

Zack Bruell named a semifinalist for 2016 James Beard Award

The James Beard Foundation announced today its list of Restaurant and Chef Award semifinalists for the 26th annual James Beard Foundation Awards.

Selected from a list of more than 20,000 online entries, the prestigious group of semifinalists in 21 categories represents a wide range of culinary talent, from exceptional chefs and dining destinations in ten different regions across the U.S.

Bruell and his restaurant Parallax are named in the "Best Chef, Great Lakes" category. Read the entire release here.
 

Calabrese advocates for transit funding at Statehouse

Joe Calabrese, CEO and General Manager of the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (RTA) advocated for more transit funding in testimony on Feb. 16 at the Statehouse.

"RTA is the largest public transportation agency in Ohio. My employees, who reside in 16 of Ohio counties, serve approximately 50 million customers each year in Cuyahoga and several neighboring counties," said Calabrese in his address.

"Public transit in Ohio is a $900 million industry that supports many manufacturers, suppliers and jobs.

Public transit gets workers to work, students to school, connects important destinations, drives economic development and provides mobility to many Ohioans who have no other mobility option due to economic realities or disabilities."

Read his comments in their entirety here.
 

The Daily Meal names The Velvet Tango Room to list of 150 best bars in America

"Proprietor Paulius Nasvytis and the bartenders of The Velvet Tango Room are 'torchbearers of tradition.' Since 1996, the bartenders here were serving classic cocktails long before it was trendy. There are more than 80 cocktails on the menu; about 30 of them are house creations, including the India Lime Fizz (a rich, creamy, and powerful cocktail that combines gin, rum, flora India limes, vanilla, and a whole egg). The bar is housed in a space that was once a speakeasy — bullet holes can still be seen in the ceiling. The bar and back bar are made of refinished mahogany and the front room feature a baby grand piano at which music is played nightly by a three-piece jazz combo and a late-night pianist. The second room is reached by walking through a mirror in the coatroom. There's another baby grand piano there, along with a cozy fireplace, comfy leather chairs, and, further beyond, a patio where some of the bar's cocktail ingredients are grown. Both rooms have an old-fashioned black-and-white TV that shows classic movies with no sound. There are limited snacks, like speck, which is locally sourced smoked pork belly made by a German family in Cleveland."

Read the full story here.

Travel + Leisure readers rank Cleveland one of America's best food cities

"The rust belt city offers some old-fashioned, even old-world, charms. Readers ranked it at No. 5 for its rich food halls, like West Side Market—with spices, baked goods and delis—which dates back to 1912, when it catered primarily to the city’s immigrants."

Read the full story here.
 

city club ceo asks: can cleveland overcome its race problem?

"As chief executive of the City Club of Cleveland—a 102-year-old institution created to foster dialogue about local, national and international issues—I often find myself in the midst of conversations about the city. So when I—a white guy—am in a meeting about policing or witnessing the inability of some white people here to understand why Tamir’s death catalyzed such vocal and visible protests, I remember what a divided city this really is."

Read the full story here.

michael symon is cleveland's real king, says huffington post

Michael Symon is as unpretentious as they come -- despite the fame he's garnered as one of America's top chefs. That's the opinion of one Huff Po writer.

"What you don't see on TV or hear on the podcast, is the darker side of the Culinary Revolution," writes comedian and foodie Mark DeCarlo. "The egos, the screaming, the pretentious posturing that happens when chefs start to believe their own PR. That's what you don't see, unless you're watching Hell's Kitchen -- because you think 'reality TV' is really 'real.' It's not."

"But Cleveland's Michael Symon is the real deal -- even though now, he's a big TV star on ABC's 'The Chew' ... "

Read the full story here.

mayor jackson announces plans to introduce $100m bond to city council

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson announced this week that on Monday, December 8th, his administration will be "introducing to Cleveland City Council an ordinance for a $100 million bond as an investment in the future of the City of Cleveland."

The bond, the city stated in a press release, will be used to invest in four areas: roads and bridges, the city’s emergency response fleet, city-owned facilities and new neighborhood projects.

According to the release, the Jackson administration believes it can stimulate investment in neighborhoods beyond those usually cited as examples of success -- such as Ohio City and University Circle -- and especially areas that have not alrady seen recent private development.

"The final $25 million will go towards new city neighborhood projects and investments outside of the city’s central business district," the press release states. "Previous public investments in city neighborhoods have resulted in positive private investment occurring; however, some neighborhoods, in spite of public investments, have not seen equal private investment."

"The City of Cleveland believes that, through focused neighborhood planning and continued investment in the city infrastructure and facilities, the $100 million bond issue will provide essential public capital intended to leverage private investment in neighborhoods where it has been lacking," the press release continues.

Mayor Jackson is quoted as saying: “With this investment, we will not only have better roads, bridges, facilities, vehicles, and recreation centers, but it will also stimulate economic growth, and promote more private investments in the city’s neighborhoods that have the greatest challenges to private investments."

To read the complete press release, click here.

discover cleveland's neighborhoods through cle city life tours

Cleveland Neighborhood Progress has announced that it will be hosting two CLE City Life tours on Saturday, November 29th and Saturday, December 27th.

"Cleveland Neighborhood Progress is pleased to offer citywide bus tours to introduce (or re-introduce) you to some of the coolest and most unique places to live in Northeast Ohio," the website states. "Join us and see why Tremont and Ohio City receive so much publicity. We’ll show you why University Circle is considered the most intellectual square mile in the nation. And you’ll understand why demand is so high for Downtown living options. All this and more!"

The cost is $12. You can register here.

ny times: 'mass mobs' are the latest trend in rust belt catholicism

According to a New York Times article on Sunday, October 12th, "mass mobs" are breathing life -- and money -- into under-attended churches in cities throughout the Rust Belt.

The Times describes a Mass mob as "part heritage tour and part mixer" that brings "thousands of suburban Catholics to visit the struggling, in some cases closed, urban churches of their parents and grandparents." Social media is used to organize groups that will join together to attend Mass at a given parish.

The Mass mob movement began in Buffalo, NY in November 2013 and has quickly spread around the Rust Belt to cities like Cleveland, Detroit, and Chicago.

Holy Ghost Church in Tremont is profiled in the article. To read the full story, click here.

travel writer discovers 'the quirky side of cleveland'

In feature titled “Discovering the quirky side of Cleveland,” travel writer Katherine Calos of the Richmond Times-Dispatch focuses on the less conventional side of some Cleveland hotspots.
 
“You really know a city when you know its quirks. So, let’s get to know Cleveland,” she leads off.

“Where else would you find the world’s largest chandelier hanging over a city street, Froot Loops on hot dogs, religious statues lovingly restored by a makeup artist, a leg lamp in the Christmas house that made it famous, a portrait featuring eye protection from whale-oil lamps and a museum that’s enshrined the remains of a disc jockey?”

Highlighted for inclusion are:

The Happy Dog: “Chili cheese dogs seem a little lame when compared with the Mobile Home-Wrecker, the Sunday Night Special, the 1:45 AM Special and East Meets West -- a few of the suggestions for combining the 50 available toppings for the $5 hot dogs.”

The Playhouse Square Chandelier: “The world’s largest outdoor chandelier, according to the Guinness World Records, became the centerpiece of Cleveland’s theater district in May. It’s already become an icon for Playhouse Square.”

A Christmas Story House: “If you’ve ever marveled at the supreme tackiness of the leg lamp in the 1983 movie “A Christmas Story,” you’ll love it in its natural setting.”

Cleveland Museum of Art: “Put on your coolest shades for a ‘selfie’ with Nathaniel Olds. That’s what he did when he sat for a portrait in 1837. His fashionable green-tinted eyeglasses offered protection from the bright light of Argand lamps, which produced about 10 times as much light as other whale-oil lamps.”
 
Read the rest right here.

university study ranks cities' walkability; cleveland in top 10

In a recently released report by the Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis at George Washington University School of Business in conjunction with Smart Growth America, the 30 largest U.S. cities were ranked by how walkable they are. This is key indicator on how cities are shifting from suburban sprawl to urban infill.

“The researchers, including Leinberger, first looked at Walkscore heat maps, focusing on areas that scored high. They then looked at areas with significant regional importance, meaning they have at least 1.4 million square feet of office space and more than 340,000 square feet of retail space. They combined these factors to determine areas they call "walkable urban places" or WalkUPs.”

But the report doesn’t just evaluate the present; it looks ahead.

“Researchers then tried to predict how these areas would grow in the future by looking at trend lines and pricing premiums in rent space, which indicate demand level. For example, demand around train stations in places like Washington, D.C. is so high commercial and residential renters can pay a premium of between 50 and 80 percent, said Emerick Corsi, president of Cleveland-based Forest City Enterprises Real Estate Services.

Coming in at No. 10 is Cleveland.

“Ohio's largest city hangs on to the bottom spot in the Top 10, but that may change soon. It's set to plummet to No. 24 in the future. Cleveland is one of a handful of older industrial cities where walkability is largely rooted in the past, where a strong city center is walkable while the rest of the surrounding suburban area lacks any kind of walkable urban space.”

Read the rest here.

time out calls cleveland 'a road trip for food lovers'

In a Time Out Chicago feature titled, “Road trips for food-lovers: Cleveland,” writer Rebecca Skoch offer road-trippers a quick weekend itinerary for food-focused visitors to our fair city.

“With a mix of old school restaurants and ambitious chefs, the Ohio city is an up-and-coming culinary destination,” she writes.
“Cleveland's restaurant and bar scene has been gaining momentum over the past few years. Celebrity chefs like Michael Symon of Lola and Lolita have taken the lead in championing local dining, and long-standing favorites are finally gaining the recognition they deserve.”

“Here are a few places not to miss during a summer weekend on the shores of Lake Erie.”

Among the places highlighted in the piece are Flying Fig, West Side Market, Sokolowski's, Greenhouse Tavern and Porco Lounge.
 
Read the rest here.
 

#thisiscle promo video goes viral in 3- 2- 1...

On Wednesday, Positively Cleveland, the convention and visitors bureau for Cleveland, announced a new destination brand, presented new plans for its destination development initiatives, unveiled a local social media movement and highlighted a series of organizational accomplishments.
 
But without question, the most buzzed about element of the package was the following video, "A Cleveland Anthem," which promotes the theme: "Cleveland doesn’t follow anyone’s rules – it makes its own."




cleveland, the next brooklyn, says forbes

In a CNN Money feature titled "The Fortune Crystal Ball," the publication offers up its prognostications for the coming year, among them: Which cities will be the next Brooklyns, and which the next Detroits. Spoiler alert: Cleveland is pegged as a "Brooklyn."
 
"The American geography of prosperity has been driven by two big narratives in the past few years. On the one hand, there's Detroit, with its $18 billion in debt, pension mess, and population loss. On the other, there's Brooklyn, with its rocketing real estate prices, hip-luxe condos, and freshly foraged food stores," notes the money pub.
 
So, just what cities are deemed a "breakout town"?
 
New Brooklyns
 
Cleveland. The city is in the midst of a downtown revival that has seen not one, not two, but three Williamsburg-esque neighborhoods emerge: Tremont, Ohio City, and Gordon Square.
 
Odds of it becoming the "next Brooklyn" are placed at 63%.
 
Read the rest here.

76 Tremont Articles | Page: | Show All
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