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Playhouse Square : In The News

52 Playhouse Square Articles | Page: | Show All

Warren A. Sill Fund annual event to celebrate partnership with CMC and CMSD

On Saturday, April 9, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., the Warren A. Sill Fund (WASF) will host "Spring out of Hibernation," at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, 1309 Euclid Ave. Two hundred attendees are expected to celebrate the launch of the Fund’s early education program and its past scholarship recipients.Tickets are $35 and can be purchased here.
 
The WASF board of directors will unveil an innovative partnership with the Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD) and the Children’s Museum of Cleveland (CMC) that will provide quality extra-classroom experiences to 20 underprivileged pre-kindergarten students at Euclid Park Elementary, 17914 Euclid Ave.
 
“Cleveland Metropolitan School District and Euclid Park PreK-8 School are excited that we were given the opportunity to join this incredible partnership. Through the generosity of The Warren A. Sill Fund, our PreK students will benefit greatly from hands-on, inquiry-based learning through the Children’s Museum of Cleveland,” Qianna Tidmore of CMSD’s Office of Early Childhood Education said in a release.
 
“The Fund’s greatest quality is its ability to dream – beyond the tragedy of Warren’s passing and now beyond the parameters of traditional education philanthropy,” Tyler Allchin, chair and cofounder of WASF added.

“In partnership with two tremendous institutions, the Fund has the opportunity to deliver an extraordinary return on a strategic investment in Cleveland’s PreK population,” said Allchin in the release.
 
 

Calabrese advocates for transit funding at Statehouse

Joe Calabrese, CEO and General Manager of the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (RTA) advocated for more transit funding in testimony on Feb. 16 at the Statehouse.

"RTA is the largest public transportation agency in Ohio. My employees, who reside in 16 of Ohio counties, serve approximately 50 million customers each year in Cuyahoga and several neighboring counties," said Calabrese in his address.

"Public transit in Ohio is a $900 million industry that supports many manufacturers, suppliers and jobs.

Public transit gets workers to work, students to school, connects important destinations, drives economic development and provides mobility to many Ohioans who have no other mobility option due to economic realities or disabilities."

Read his comments in their entirety here.
 

Travel + Leisure readers rank Cleveland one of America's best food cities

"The rust belt city offers some old-fashioned, even old-world, charms. Readers ranked it at No. 5 for its rich food halls, like West Side Market—with spices, baked goods and delis—which dates back to 1912, when it catered primarily to the city’s immigrants."

Read the full story here.
 

city club ceo asks: can cleveland overcome its race problem?

"As chief executive of the City Club of Cleveland—a 102-year-old institution created to foster dialogue about local, national and international issues—I often find myself in the midst of conversations about the city. So when I—a white guy—am in a meeting about policing or witnessing the inability of some white people here to understand why Tamir’s death catalyzed such vocal and visible protests, I remember what a divided city this really is."

Read the full story here.

cleveland playhouse named one of the 10 best regional theatres in u.s.

"The year 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the Cleveland Play House, the country’s first professional regional theater. Over the decades, the company has created more than 1,300 productions, seen by more than 12 million people."

Read the full story here.

healthline cited as model of bold, beautiful bus rapid transit

"Unlike standard bus stops, which are situated along the curb on opposite sides of a street, BRT stations function better in the center. There are practical reasons for this design, the biggest being that it's cheaper to build one nice station per stop than two. But it all comes back to presenting BRT more as a train platform than a bus stand (below, a rendering of a central station in Vientiane, Laos, and a finished one on the HealthLine BRT in Cleveland)."

Read the full story here.

mayor jackson announces plans to introduce $100m bond to city council

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson announced this week that on Monday, December 8th, his administration will be "introducing to Cleveland City Council an ordinance for a $100 million bond as an investment in the future of the City of Cleveland."

The bond, the city stated in a press release, will be used to invest in four areas: roads and bridges, the city’s emergency response fleet, city-owned facilities and new neighborhood projects.

According to the release, the Jackson administration believes it can stimulate investment in neighborhoods beyond those usually cited as examples of success -- such as Ohio City and University Circle -- and especially areas that have not alrady seen recent private development.

"The final $25 million will go towards new city neighborhood projects and investments outside of the city’s central business district," the press release states. "Previous public investments in city neighborhoods have resulted in positive private investment occurring; however, some neighborhoods, in spite of public investments, have not seen equal private investment."

"The City of Cleveland believes that, through focused neighborhood planning and continued investment in the city infrastructure and facilities, the $100 million bond issue will provide essential public capital intended to leverage private investment in neighborhoods where it has been lacking," the press release continues.

Mayor Jackson is quoted as saying: “With this investment, we will not only have better roads, bridges, facilities, vehicles, and recreation centers, but it will also stimulate economic growth, and promote more private investments in the city’s neighborhoods that have the greatest challenges to private investments."

To read the complete press release, click here.

discover cleveland's neighborhoods through cle city life tours

Cleveland Neighborhood Progress has announced that it will be hosting two CLE City Life tours on Saturday, November 29th and Saturday, December 27th.

"Cleveland Neighborhood Progress is pleased to offer citywide bus tours to introduce (or re-introduce) you to some of the coolest and most unique places to live in Northeast Ohio," the website states. "Join us and see why Tremont and Ohio City receive so much publicity. We’ll show you why University Circle is considered the most intellectual square mile in the nation. And you’ll understand why demand is so high for Downtown living options. All this and more!"

The cost is $12. You can register here.

the cleveland foundation's latest centennial gift is a free day of theater

As part of its centennial celebration, the Cleveland Foundation has anounced that it is giving away a free day of theater at Playhouse Square. The gift includes 2,300 free tickets to five holiday performances by the Cleveland Play House, Great Lakes Theatre and Cleveland Public Theatre on Sunday, November 30th. To be eligible, you must enter your name into an online ticket lottery system for the chance to receive up to four tickets to a single show.

From the press release:

"The Cleveland Foundation Day of Theater will include the following productions at PlayhouseSquare:

·         'A Christmas Story' by Cleveland Play House at the Allen Theatre at 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. (family-friendly show)
·         'A Christmas Carol' by Great Lakes Theater at the Ohio Theatre at 3 p.m. (family-friendly show)
·         'The Santaland Diaries' by Cleveland Public Theatre at the Outcalt Theatre at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. (adults-only show)

Beginning today, people can enter the online lottery at www.playhousesquare.org/giftlottery. The website is currently open and will remain open for 100 hours or just over four days, until 1 p.m. Friday, Nov. 7. This lottery is not first-come, first-served; residents will be randomly selected to attend the performances."

The Cleveland Foundation has helped to sustain and bolster all three theater organizations, and officials decided to use this latest centennial gift as a way to expose more Clevelanders to the gift of theater.
 

travel writer discovers 'the quirky side of cleveland'

In feature titled “Discovering the quirky side of Cleveland,” travel writer Katherine Calos of the Richmond Times-Dispatch focuses on the less conventional side of some Cleveland hotspots.
 
“You really know a city when you know its quirks. So, let’s get to know Cleveland,” she leads off.

“Where else would you find the world’s largest chandelier hanging over a city street, Froot Loops on hot dogs, religious statues lovingly restored by a makeup artist, a leg lamp in the Christmas house that made it famous, a portrait featuring eye protection from whale-oil lamps and a museum that’s enshrined the remains of a disc jockey?”

Highlighted for inclusion are:

The Happy Dog: “Chili cheese dogs seem a little lame when compared with the Mobile Home-Wrecker, the Sunday Night Special, the 1:45 AM Special and East Meets West -- a few of the suggestions for combining the 50 available toppings for the $5 hot dogs.”

The Playhouse Square Chandelier: “The world’s largest outdoor chandelier, according to the Guinness World Records, became the centerpiece of Cleveland’s theater district in May. It’s already become an icon for Playhouse Square.”

A Christmas Story House: “If you’ve ever marveled at the supreme tackiness of the leg lamp in the 1983 movie “A Christmas Story,” you’ll love it in its natural setting.”

Cleveland Museum of Art: “Put on your coolest shades for a ‘selfie’ with Nathaniel Olds. That’s what he did when he sat for a portrait in 1837. His fashionable green-tinted eyeglasses offered protection from the bright light of Argand lamps, which produced about 10 times as much light as other whale-oil lamps.”
 
Read the rest right here.

new york times takes a shine to cleveland's reuse policies

In the Travel section of the New York Times, writer Peter Larson details the robust reuse approach to development taking place in Cleveland. Titled “Cleveland, a City Repurposed,” the article describes various projects in the city that made use of vacant historic structures.

“If there had to be a slogan to describe Cleveland as it is today, ‘what’s old is new again’ would undoubtedly be it,” Larson writes. “In the last few years, locals and businesses in this Midwest metropolis have been repurposing historic buildings from its heyday in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and turning them into restaurants, stores and draws for both residents and tourists. Many of these structures had sat empty for a decade or more before restoration efforts began infusing a vibrancy into this once-somewhat-downtrodden city.”

Examples given include Cowell & Hubbard, Zack Bruell’s upscale French restaurant that opened in a former jewelry boutique of the same name. The Horseshoe Casino, which now occupies the first four floors of the former Higbee’s department store. Ohio City’s Transformer Station, which was built in 1924 as a power-converter station for the local streetcar line. And the Greater Cleveland Aquarium, also built in a defunct power station.

Read the rest right here.

university study ranks cities' walkability; cleveland in top 10

In a recently released report by the Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis at George Washington University School of Business in conjunction with Smart Growth America, the 30 largest U.S. cities were ranked by how walkable they are. This is key indicator on how cities are shifting from suburban sprawl to urban infill.

“The researchers, including Leinberger, first looked at Walkscore heat maps, focusing on areas that scored high. They then looked at areas with significant regional importance, meaning they have at least 1.4 million square feet of office space and more than 340,000 square feet of retail space. They combined these factors to determine areas they call "walkable urban places" or WalkUPs.”

But the report doesn’t just evaluate the present; it looks ahead.

“Researchers then tried to predict how these areas would grow in the future by looking at trend lines and pricing premiums in rent space, which indicate demand level. For example, demand around train stations in places like Washington, D.C. is so high commercial and residential renters can pay a premium of between 50 and 80 percent, said Emerick Corsi, president of Cleveland-based Forest City Enterprises Real Estate Services.

Coming in at No. 10 is Cleveland.

“Ohio's largest city hangs on to the bottom spot in the Top 10, but that may change soon. It's set to plummet to No. 24 in the future. Cleveland is one of a handful of older industrial cities where walkability is largely rooted in the past, where a strong city center is walkable while the rest of the surrounding suburban area lacks any kind of walkable urban space.”

Read the rest here.

introducing cleveland, the 'entertainment capital you never knew about'

In a Travelers Today feature titled "Five Reasons Cleveland is the Entertainment Capital You Never Knew About,' writer Will Walker calls our fair city "one of largest and most underrated cultural hot-spots in the country."
 
According to Walker, here are five reasons Cleveland is the entertainment capital that's "ripe for exploration by any traveler adventurous enough to take a chance on it."
 
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
 
"Opened in 1995 by Atlantic Records founder Ahmet Ertegun, the Rock Hall marks a must-see destination for anyone interested in Rock & Roll, music, or pop culture in general.
 
Cinematheque
 
The Cleveland Institute of Art's Cinematheque offers what the New York Times called one of the country's "best repertory movie theaters."
 
Cleveland Museum of Art
 
Cleveland has one of the "best and most important art museums in the country, boasting works from artists as diverse as Caravaggio, David, and Monet."
 
Playhouse Square
 
"The second largest theatrical complex in the country (outside of New York) Playhouse Square's nine theaters sprawl over two city blocks, casting an impressive shadow of cultural sophistication that the rest of the city can't help but take note of."
 
Cleveland Orchestra
 
According to the British music periodical Gramophone, the Cleveland Orchestra ranks as the seventh best in the world, topping every single United States orchestra outside of Chicago.
 
Read the rest of the good news here.
 

playhouse square chandelier attracting glow of national media

In a Gizmodo feature titled, "The World's Biggest Outdoor Chandelier Beckons You to Cleveland's Stage," writer Andrew Tarantola describes the past and present of Playhouse Square, and some technical info on the new chandelier.
 
"For a time in the Vaudeville Era, few theater districts outside of Broadway were hotter than Cleveland, Ohio's. But as the decades rolled on and times changed, the district fell upon hard times. But now, after a concerted revitalization effort, the the crown jewel of the district is back in business -- and it sports the world's largest outdoor chandelier to prove it," he writes.
 
The world's largest permanent crystal chandelier is "comprised of more than 4,200 crystals and illuminated by 70 GE LED Infusion Modules. The 20-foot tall crystalline (actually acrylic resin, not glass) structure is suspended from steel trusses some 44 feet off the ground at the corner of E. 14th Street and Euclid Avenue."
 
"And don't worry about the snow," he writes, "this installation has been designed specifically to cope with the frigid conditions presented by Cleveland's harsh winters, and has been thoroughly stress tested."
 
Read the rest of the news here.
 
 

thriving playhouse square neighborhood profiled in new york times

In a New York Times feature titled, "Cleveland’s Thriving Theater Hub Lures Residents," writer Erik Piepenburg outlines how Playhouse Square continues to evolve from an entertainment-only district to a 24/7 community.
 
"Residents of Midtown Manhattan are accustomed to walking to the Theater District to see what’s new on Broadway," Piepenburg writes. "But Mr. Hawley’s trip to and from Cleveland’s gilded Palace Theater was something much more significant. It was a sign, decades in the making, that this city’s efforts to create a thriving residential real estate market in its downtown core was starting to look more like a box-office hit than a flop."
 
The article ticks off positive statistics, supplied by Downtown Cleveland Alliance, that state that roughly 12,000 residents now call downtown Cleveland home, double the amount in 2000. Rental occupancy hovers near 95 percent.
 
"Almost 40 years after the closing of Jacque Brel, and after millions of dollars in renovations and area development, people are not just being entertained in Cleveland’s theater district," notes Piepenburg. "They’re calling it home."
 
Read the rest of the good news here.

52 Playhouse Square Articles | Page: | Show All
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