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crop bistro included in listing of cool restaurants in converted spaces

In a Thrillist feature titled, "Drinking in Banks and Jails: 21 Restaurants/Bars Converted from Very Different Buildings, Crop Bistro in Ohio City earns a spot.
 
"We've all been in a Thai restaurant that was obviously once a Pizza Hut, but even the ghost of a stuffed-crust pizza haunting your pad Thai has nothing on a cool, old building that's been converted to a place where you can stuff your face or give your liver a workout," writes Andy Kryza. "From an old elementary school to a jail and an airplane, these 21 joints keep their historical roots while also keeping you fat and happy."
 
Crop Bar and Bistro
Cleveland, OH
 
What it was: A gigantic 1925 bank, complete with marble columns, huge arches, and 17,000 feet of floor space.
 
What it is now: "One of Ohio's most-lauded restaurants, Crop has kept the integrity of the space intact -- from the remastered columns to the gigantic murals over the bar -- while cooking up high-end cuisine in an open kitchen set up right in the middle of the packed floor. In the basement, meanwhile, you can rent out the vault space, which is great for parties or, in the event of a zombie apocalypse, survival."
 
Read the rest of the listacle here.


pittsburgh post-gazette writer 'gets market buzz in cleveland'

In a feature titled, "Getting a Market Buzz in Cleveland," Pittsburgh Post-Gazette writer Diana Nelson Jones compares the West Side Market to her city's eclectic Strip District, as that city plots a course for a grand future marketplace of its own.
 
"Except for the selection of dried beans at Urban Herbs, the West Side Market in Cleveland doesn’t sell anything you can’t find in Pittsburgh’s Strip District. What they have that we don’t have is a grand work of marketplace architecture," she writes.
 
She adds that "the trip prompted many thoughts about what we have and don’t have and led to a rumination on the potential of the Pittsburgh Public Market and the Terminal Building on Smallman Street to be long-term additions to the scene."
 
"As I toured the West Side Market, I caught myself oohing and aahing, wondering why at first and then realizing why -- the intensity of consolidation. It is Wholey’s, Penn Mac, Stamolis, Parma Sausage, Sam Bok, Stan’s, Labad’s, La Prima and every farmers’ market all together in one big teeming, gleaming -- and at times overwhelming -- place."
 
"But the certainty I came away with from Cleveland was that a great city needs a great indoor market scene and any city that still has its old-world market house is blessed, lucky, farsighted or all three."
 
Read the rest of the story here.
 

forbes profiles local 'edisons' nottingham and spirk

In an article titled "The Invention Machine: Cleveland Duo Churns Out Ideas Worth Billions," written by Michael Nemeth and published in the March issue of Forbes, the founding partners of Nottingham Spirk are profiled.
 
"The closest thing in America to Thomas Edison’s New Jersey laboratory is a decommissioned Christian Science church in Cleveland. It’s here that John Nottingham, John Spirk and their team of 70 inventors, tinkerers and support staff have cooked up the Swiffer SweeperVac, Crest Spinbrush, Dirt Devil vacuum and nearly 1,000 other patented products. No, nothing as momentous as the light bulb or the phonograph, but in their nearly anonymous way -- even in Ohio, almost no one has heard of them -- Nottingham and Spirk have proven themselves as good at making money as the Wizard of Menlo Park himself."
 
“We’re probably responsible for more patents than any other company our size,” says Nottingham.
 
Read the rest right here.


cleveland gets noticed as green meetings and events locale

GreenBiz, a publication devoted to helping companies integrate environmental responsibility into their operations, included Cleveland in a recent listing of "Top 10 U.S. Cities for Green Meetings in 2014."
 
Thanks to the massive environmental footprint of air travel, audiovisual equipment, food waste and more, the meetings and event industry is one of the most wasteful sectors in the US.
 
But the news is not all bad, states the article. "A handful of destinations recently debuted new or renovated meetings facilities with an environmental focus, making the new year a particularly exciting one for green meetings."
 
"These 10 cities in particular stand out as top choices for sustainable events in 2014:"
 
10. Cleveland
 
"Last year, Cleveland welcomed two neighboring meeting venues along its revitalized waterfront: the Cleveland Convention Center and Global Center for Health Innovation, which hosts medical events. Both were designed with an eye on sustainability; features include 138 bike racks, water-efficient landscaping, motion sensors and low-flow washroom fixtures. The convention center has a green roof with extensive plant life and soil materials, while the Global Center includes a white reflective roof. Half of the nearly nine-acre site used for the buildings has been preserved as open space, and 97 percent of debris was recycled during construction. The venues are currently seeking LEED Silver certification."
 
"Sustainability is not just addressed in the design of these venues -- sustainability is the design of these venues," says Sarah Blanchard, spokesperson for LMN architects, which designed the facilities. "Displaying the future of health and health care and welcoming visitors from across the globe to a state-of-the-art convention center are civic hallmarks that demand a design centered on efficiency and technology."
 
Read the rest of the green news here.


playhouse square's outdoor chandelier shines bright already

Gizmag, a long-running technology publication, recently highlighted PlayhouseSquare's forthcoming outdoor chandelier in a feature titled, "World's Largest Outdoor Chandelier to Illuminate Cleveland's PlayhouseSquare."
 
Writing for Gizmag, Brian Dodson states, "PlayhouseSquare in Cleveland's historic theater district is erecting what is claimed as the world's largest outdoor crystal chandelier. With a height of 20 ft (6 m) and comprising some 4,200 crystal pieces."
 
The 20-ft tall chandelier will contain 4,200 crystal pieces and tens of thousands of LED lights and lighting modules. The chandelier will be permanently suspended 44 ft (13.5 m) above the street from a special steel support system.
 
"The biggest surprise is that General Electric, which is designing the chandelier, believes it will stand up to Cleveland's extreme weather."
 
That includes temps that range from -20° F (-29° C) to 104° F (40° C), with winds as high as 85 mph (137 km/h) – not to mention the occasional severe thunderstorm, tornado, and roaming hurricane.
 
The unveiling is scheduled for May 2, 2014.
 
Read the rest of the story here.


'best things in cle' called out in atlantic cities

In an Atlantic Cities end-of-year feature titled “The Best Thing My City Did This Year,” the editorial staff highlighted the Cleveland Museum of Art birthing a magnificent new atrium that doubles as public gathering space as one of the major highlights of the year for the city.
 
"My Cleveland 2013 was full of energy, risk-taking and community-based huzzahs. Culturally, high came to mass at both the Cleveland Museum of Art, where a stunning new atrium became our public gathering place, and the Cleveland Orchestra did a neighborhood-based residency,” shares Anne Trubek, founding editor of Belt magazine.
 
Other items of note mentioned include developments in Waterloo, St. Clair-Superior, and Detroit-Shoreway that will build the foundation for 2014.
 
Check out the full piece here.


new york times travel section checks into new aloft

In a hotel review in the travel section of the New York Times, writer Erik Piepenburg checks into the new Aloft hotel on the East Bank of the Flats and files a glowing review.
 
"The Aloft Downtown gives Cleveland a major boost of bright, colorful and contemporary hotel design in an area -- and a city -- not known for style-centric accommodations," he writes.
 
The article covers the rooms, amenities and available dining options. "A Saturday night meal at Willeyville included delicious vegetarian options for me (grilled sweet corn, baked gnocchi), plenty of meat for a friend and a mind-blowing fried peach pie," he notes.
 
The bottom line, concludes the author, the new Aloft is a "terrific place for design geeks, foodies and fans of rust-belt chic who like their boutique hotel on the industrial side."
 
Read the rest right here.


museum of contemporary art boasts impressive first-year numbers

In an Art Daily feature titled "MOCA Cleveland releases metrics of strong inaugural year in new building, Uptown," the art publication shares impressive numbers from the museum's first year in its new building.

"In the first year in their new building, MOCA delivered significantly expanded audiences and benefits," says the article.
 
Among them:
 
55,997 visitors took advantage of MOCA’s offerings, up 284 percent from recent years
 
650+ new members, tripling membership in MOCA’s new home
 
The numbers also show how MOCA’s impressive new building at the corner of Mayfield Road and Euclid Avenue acts as a beacon to draw people to University Circle and Uptown.
 
82 percent of MOCA’s visitors are coming to University Circle specifically to visit the Museum
 
70 percent of MOCA’s visitors are eating at a surrounding restaurant
 
24 percent are shopping while in the area
 
Read about the rest here.


input wanted for design of new convention center hotel

County residents are being asked to share their opinions as they pertain to the new Convention Center Hotel. The 650-room hotel will replace the Cuyahoga County Administrative building at Lakeside Avenue and Ontario Street and serve as the main hotel for the nearby medical mart and convention center.
 
Representatives from the architecture firm Cooper Carry will be in town on Wednesday, November 20th, from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. to share preliminary designs for the new Convention Center Hotel and solicit input from local residents.
 
The hotel is on a fast track, with County Executive Ed FitzGerald stating a goal of a 2016 opening.
 
The meeting is free and open to the public.
 
Cleveland Public Library
Louis Stokes Wing Auditorium
325 Superior Avenue East
 
Questions and registration (not required): info@LAND-studio.org

fast co. digs into 'world's first biocellar' in east cleveland

In a Fast Co. feature called "Turning A Vacant Cleveland House Into A Fancy Farm," California-based sustainability writer Adele Peters details the plans and construction of the world’s first BioCellar, located in East Cleveland.
 
"The BioCellar, the brainchild of a Cleveland biologist named Jean Loria, will use just the basement of the house -- the rest was torn down -- and will top it with a greenhouse so crops can grow inside. Why a cellar? At depths below four feet, the ground stays at a constant temperature, so even in the middle of a harsh Cleveland winter, the room won't get colder than 50 degrees. With light flooding in from the glass roof above, food can grow year round."
 
Read the rest of the crop report here.


d.c. streets covers major policy shift at local planning agency

In a DC Streets Blog post titled "In Cleveland, An Old-School Planning Agency Sees the Light," writer Angie Schmitt writes of the dramatic turn around currently talking place at Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency (NOACA), a topic Fresh Water recently covered in depth.
 
"NOACA was so notoriously averse to change and ineffectual that it acquired the nickname NO ACTION," Schmitt writes. "But as impossible as it seemed even a year ago, things are changing at NOACA. They’re changing fast, and for the better. Last year the agency hired a new director, Grace Gallucci, who had been the head of finance for the Chicago Transit Authority. Since the Cleveland native assumed her role at the head of the NOACA, the region agency has adopted a completely different tenor."

Read more about how the local planning agency is shifting gears here.


waterloo's krege grant in the news

In a Nonprofit Quarterly story titled “Innovative “Placemaking,” Kresge Grant Makes Use of Opportune Moment,” writer Eileen Cunniffe details how the Northeast Shores Development Corp. in Cleveland's Collinwood neighborhood has received a $1 million grant from the Kresge Foundation to support the Waterloo Arts and Entertainment District.
 
“Most of this grant will go toward permanent improvements: creating a ceramics co-op studio, further developing artists’ live-work spaces, and converting vacant spaces into homes for artists. But a portion of the grant will support temporary programming aimed at keeping the district open -- and lively -- during the construction phase.”
 
Cunniffe goes on to outline the mission of the Kresge Foundation’s Arts & Culture program and why they felt the Collinwood neighborhood was a worthy recipient.
 
Read the full story here.


local designer has shot to take it all in martha stewart maker awards

If you've shopped at Banyan Tree, CLE Clothing Co., Bizaare Bazaar or Native Cleveland -- and you have an eye for design -- than you doubtless have spotted the work of Brian Andrew Jasinski. His design-minded line of prints and social stationery, which are sold under the brand Grey Cardigan, feature an instantly recognizable aesthetic that is clean, modern and timeless.
 
For the past couple weeks, Jasinski has been on a social media blitz to drum up support for his participation in the American Made Audience Choice Awards, where Martha Stewart and the editors of Martha Stewart Living are spotlighting the next generation of great American makers.
 
Well, it's worked, as the designer has made it to the finalist round, where he is one of just six, whittled down from a beginning pool of more than 2,000 nominees. His category, Design, joins Food, Style, Craft, Garden and Technology.
 
"To make it as one of six finalists in a competition with 2,000-plus nominees is an honor and an accomplishment," says Jasinski , a graduate of Cleveland Institute of Art. "Friends and fans truly stepped up to the plate daily in their voting and promoting."
 
The final round of voting, which runs now through September 29, pits Jasinski up against the other five finalists. The grand prize winner will receive $10,000 for their business, a feature spread in Martha Stewart Living, a feature on her popular radio show, and an audience with the Domestic Goddess herself.
 
"To win this competition would bring my work to an incredible spotlight that its connection with Martha Stewart would offer," says Jasinski.
 
To support Jasinski and his quest, vote up to six times a day right here.


ohio city selected as 'best old house neighborhood' in this old house

Ohio City continues to attract attention both locally, regionally, and nationally for a wealth of positive reasons. The latest praise comes from the editors of This Old House magazine.

In the latest issue, Ohio City was included in the magazine's annual "Best Old House Neighborhoods" issue. What's more, the west side hamlet was deemed an Editor's Choice thanks to its Victorian-era homes that range from simple vernacular worker cottages to Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, Stick-style, and Italianate homes.
 
"This former shipbuilding center just west of downtown Cleveland had a growth spurt in the latter half of the 1800s, when workers and managers for the area's docks, distilleries, and mills settled there," the editors write.
 
Garnering specific attention was Ohio City's walkability.
 
Read the rest right here.


ny times gives ink to new rust belt mag 'belt'

In a New York Times Arts Beat post titled “New Magazine Celebrates ‘Rust Belt Chic,’ With a Wink,” writer Jennifer Schuessler details her conversation with Belt magazine editor Anne Trubek about a new publication dedicated to fostering a new journalistic beat in Cleveland.
 
"The decaying cities of the post-industrial Midwest can sometimes seem like a museum of things America used to make: cars, refrigerators, steel, televisions. But if a start-up in Cleveland gets its way, the region may help rebuild the market for another endangered product -- long-form magazine journalism," Schuessler writes.
The magazine offers up a collection of essays and reporting that seeks to explore the regional identity that is known as the Rust Belt.
 
“I cringe at words like ‘authentic,’” Trubek says in the article. “But the rust belt aesthetic isn’t about the ephemeral global economy, it’s about boots on the ground and things hidden in grandma’s attic. We want to explore that.”
 
Check out the full interview here.

86 Design Articles | Page: | Show All
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