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newsweek highlights lee road, the 'bitcoin boulevard' in cleveland heights

In a Newsweek article titled "Bitcoin Makes the Jump to Brick-and-Mortar in Cleveland," reporter Joe Kloc describes the details of a new digital currency, Bitcoin, and how numerous retailers on Lee Road in Cleveland Heights have adapted the system.

"Most of the customers at Mitchell’s Fine Chocolates in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, are locals who have been reared from birth on its chocolate-covered marshmallows, pecan turtles and half-dipped apricots," Kloc writes. "But lately, says Bill Mitchell, the shop’s 54-year-old proprietor, there have been some new faces."
 
Mitchell goes on to describe a fresh-faced couple who recently shopped at his store, and while the visit was unremarkable, the payment was anything but.
 
“I couldn’t even tell you what they bought,” the Mitchell confessed. But what he does remember is how the couple paid: "with about 0.12 bitcoins."

"Mitchell is one of a dozen shop owners on Lee Road in Cleveland Heights who have joined together to accept the controversial digital cryptocurrency in the hope of attracting new customers, and as a way to avoid credit card fees. Since May 1, bitcoiners have traveled to the tree-lined street in northeast Ohio from as far away as North Carolina. Here, they trade their bitcoins for ice cream cones, haircuts and handmade Colombian bracelets, and are sent off with a 'buh-bye now,' the local parlance on what bills itself as America’s first Bitcoin Boulevard."

“We don’t expect a windfall,” says Nikhil Chand, founder of the bitcoin consultancy CoinNEO, who conceived of Bitcoin Boulevard late last year. “This is about so much more -- about the hurt from the fees through traditional payment.”

Read the rest of the story here.

 

philanthropist's efforts to boost young audiences at orchestra in new york times

In a New York Times post titled, "Maintaining a Classical-Music Miracle in Cleveland," writer Craig Duff covers efforts by local philanthropist Milton Maltz to increase the number of young audience members at Cleveland Orchestra performances.
 
"When Milton Maltz looked down from his box seat in Severance Hall -- the stately home of the Cleveland Orchestra -- he used to fear for its future," writes Duff.
 
"Where are the young people?" Maltz is quoted in the article.
 
The aging of audiences is something all orchestras are contending with, but Maltz decided to do something about it. He and his wife donated $20 million to help the orchestra build a younger audience, with the ambitious goal of attracting the youngest audience of any orchestra in America by 2018, the band's 100th birthday.
 
Incentives include "FanCards" that allow young concertgoers to attend as many concerts as they like per season for $50. Additional deals include free admission to summer outdoor concerts at Blossom for those under age 18. Students also can attend any concert during the subscription season for $10.
 
Efforts are paying off: in 2010, students made up 8 percent of the audience. Last year, that figure was 20 percent.
 
Read the rest of the good news here.

 

introducing cleveland, the 'entertainment capital you never knew about'

In a Travelers Today feature titled "Five Reasons Cleveland is the Entertainment Capital You Never Knew About,' writer Will Walker calls our fair city "one of largest and most underrated cultural hot-spots in the country."
 
According to Walker, here are five reasons Cleveland is the entertainment capital that's "ripe for exploration by any traveler adventurous enough to take a chance on it."
 
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
 
"Opened in 1995 by Atlantic Records founder Ahmet Ertegun, the Rock Hall marks a must-see destination for anyone interested in Rock & Roll, music, or pop culture in general.
 
Cinematheque
 
The Cleveland Institute of Art's Cinematheque offers what the New York Times called one of the country's "best repertory movie theaters."
 
Cleveland Museum of Art
 
Cleveland has one of the "best and most important art museums in the country, boasting works from artists as diverse as Caravaggio, David, and Monet."
 
Playhouse Square
 
"The second largest theatrical complex in the country (outside of New York) Playhouse Square's nine theaters sprawl over two city blocks, casting an impressive shadow of cultural sophistication that the rest of the city can't help but take note of."
 
Cleveland Orchestra
 
According to the British music periodical Gramophone, the Cleveland Orchestra ranks as the seventh best in the world, topping every single United States orchestra outside of Chicago.
 
Read the rest of the good news here.
 

playhouse square chandelier attracting glow of national media

In a Gizmodo feature titled, "The World's Biggest Outdoor Chandelier Beckons You to Cleveland's Stage," writer Andrew Tarantola describes the past and present of Playhouse Square, and some technical info on the new chandelier.
 
"For a time in the Vaudeville Era, few theater districts outside of Broadway were hotter than Cleveland, Ohio's. But as the decades rolled on and times changed, the district fell upon hard times. But now, after a concerted revitalization effort, the the crown jewel of the district is back in business -- and it sports the world's largest outdoor chandelier to prove it," he writes.
 
The world's largest permanent crystal chandelier is "comprised of more than 4,200 crystals and illuminated by 70 GE LED Infusion Modules. The 20-foot tall crystalline (actually acrylic resin, not glass) structure is suspended from steel trusses some 44 feet off the ground at the corner of E. 14th Street and Euclid Avenue."
 
"And don't worry about the snow," he writes, "this installation has been designed specifically to cope with the frigid conditions presented by Cleveland's harsh winters, and has been thoroughly stress tested."
 
Read the rest of the news here.
 
 

as cleveland goes: how the local craft beer scene is shaping up

This is the first of a three-part series written by Columbus-based Kyle Kastranec that chronicles the state of craft beer in Ohio, and how it could lend insight into national trends and future growth for the entire industry. He begins with Cleveland.
 
"Over the last few years, a new wave of breweries has been reshaping the craft beer landscape along the shores of Lake Erie," he writes. "It's not the most mature market in the country; it's not even the most mature market in the region. But Cleveland, with its fleet of fledgling and developing breweries, is becoming a bellwether for national trends and craft beer's narrative arc across the country."
 
Kastranec writes how beer and breweries directly affect the local economy and the revitalization of neighborhoods.
 
"[Andy] Tveekrem returned to Cleveland in 2010 and partnered with a local entrepreneur, Sam McNulty, to launch Market Garden Brewery, a venture that kick-started the transformation and revitalization of West 25th Street and the entire Ohio City neighborhood. "When we opened, there was about 75% vacancy on West 25th between these three blocks," Tveekrem says. "Now it's zero."
 
Of course, Great Lakes Brewing played a major role in launching the craft beer scene in Cleveland and Ohio. "But more than that, the GLBC history has shaped the very fabric of the local brewing community. Everyone is connected, and all roads lead back to Great Lakes, whose culture and attention to detail has prepared the current generation of brewers to innovate, to adapt, to grow, to anticipate market demands, and most importantly, to ensure quality through it all."
 
Read the rest of this great beer feature here.
 
 

downtown rental boom covered in wall street journal

In a Wall Street Journal feature titled, "Developers Turn Former Office Buildings into High-End Apartments," writer Eliot Brown covers Cleveland's downtown rental boom and efforts to ease that demand by converting former commercial space into residential space.
 
"Historically, office space has commanded substantially higher rent than residential space," Brown writes. "But that is starting to change, especially for older buildings that have lots of architectural charm -- often located in urban downtowns -- but are no longer desirable as top-notch office space."
 
"The Residences (in the East Ohio Gas building) are in the vanguard of a major realignment taking place in cities across the U.S. as landlords repurpose their buildings from spaces where people work to spaces where they sleep."
 
With demand for downtown rental apartments so strong, developers are racing to repurpose buildings.  
 
By 2015, Downtown Cleveland Alliance "projects that the area will have 7,071 residential units, up from 2,881 in 2000. That includes nearly 600 units in seven office-to-apartment conversions that are under way -- the most ever at one time for the city."
 
Read the rest of the story here.
 

cleveland clinic's new herbal therapy ward highlighted in time mag

In a Time feature titled "Cleveland Clinic’s New Medicine," Alexandra Sifferlin writes about the Cleveland Clinic's nonconforming efforts to incorporate Eastern herbal medicine with traditional Western medical practices.
 
"Though herbal therapy has been practiced in China for centuries, it is still an afterthought in the U.S., in part because pharmaceutical remedies are usually easier to obtain," Sifferlin writes. "Now that’s beginning to change: in January, the Cleveland Clinic opened a Chinese herbal-therapy ward."
 
In this small division, therapists at the clinic treat patients suffering from chronic pain, fatigue, poor digestion, infertility and sleep disorders.
 
“Western medicine may not have all the answers,” Daniel Neides, the clinic’s medical director, is quoted in the piece.
 
A certified herbalist runs the unit under the supervision of Western-trained doctors. Patients must be referred to the clinic by their doctor, who must oversee their treatment for at least a year.
 
Executives at the Cleveland Clinic say the clinic "is the first of its kind to be affiliated with a Western hospital."
 
“We’re incorporating ancient knowledge into patient care,” says in-house herbalist Galina Roofener.
 
Read the rest of the news right here.
 

entrepreneur mag says 'think like cleveland' to boost biz growth

In an Entrepreneur feature titled "Think Like Cleveland: 6 Ingredients to Boosting Business Growth," Jane Porter writes how Cleveland went from being on the bottom of the list in terms of startup-friendly cities to being near the top.
 
"In an Entrepreneur ranking of startup-friendly cities in 2002, Cleveland came in 61 out of 61. At the time, entrepreneurs had little by way of funding options and the startup economy was suffering," writes Porter.
 
But thanks in large part to the formation of Jumpstart, a nonprofit organization focused on helping idea-stage tech companies gain access to funds and resources, things began to turn around -- quickly.
 
The feature goes on to enumerate the six key ingredients that helped propel Cleveland forward, including innovators, advocates and storytellers.
 
Read the entire feature here.
 

cleveland clinic exports marquee brand to abu dhabi

In a Reuters article titled, "Cleveland Clinic exports marquee Ohio brand to Abu Dhabi," by Robin Respaut writes about the Clinic's plans to open a hospital on Al Maryah Island in Abu Dhabi.
 
"For decades the Cleveland Clinic has provided healthcare to the upper echelons of Middle Eastern society who fly halfway across the world for treatment at the Ohio-based private medical center," she writes. "Soon, they can skip the trip."
 
Early next year, the Cleveland Clinic will open an ultra-modern, 364-bed hospital on Al Maryah Island in Abu Dhabi. The Clinic currently helps manage the Sheikh Khalifa Medical City facility in Abu Dhabi, but this will be the first time it puts its name and personnel in the region.
 
"We look at it as our petrodollars coming home to Cleveland," Cleveland Clinic's chief executive officer Dr Toby Cosgrove said during an interview. "It's money coming back to us."
 
Read more about the state-of-the-art facility here.


crop bistro included in listing of cool restaurants in converted spaces

In a Thrillist feature titled, "Drinking in Banks and Jails: 21 Restaurants/Bars Converted from Very Different Buildings, Crop Bistro in Ohio City earns a spot.
 
"We've all been in a Thai restaurant that was obviously once a Pizza Hut, but even the ghost of a stuffed-crust pizza haunting your pad Thai has nothing on a cool, old building that's been converted to a place where you can stuff your face or give your liver a workout," writes Andy Kryza. "From an old elementary school to a jail and an airplane, these 21 joints keep their historical roots while also keeping you fat and happy."
 
Crop Bar and Bistro
Cleveland, OH
 
What it was: A gigantic 1925 bank, complete with marble columns, huge arches, and 17,000 feet of floor space.
 
What it is now: "One of Ohio's most-lauded restaurants, Crop has kept the integrity of the space intact -- from the remastered columns to the gigantic murals over the bar -- while cooking up high-end cuisine in an open kitchen set up right in the middle of the packed floor. In the basement, meanwhile, you can rent out the vault space, which is great for parties or, in the event of a zombie apocalypse, survival."
 
Read the rest of the listacle here.


cleveland selected as one of nation's most underrated food cities

Thrillist, the digital magazine for men, recently published a feature on the "The 7 most underrated food cities in America." Writer Dan Gentile included Cleveland in the listing.
 
"What makes a great food city isn't necessarily Michelin stars or food trucks per capita," he writes. "While NYC, LA, and Chicago have always shined brightest, and upstarts like Austin and Portland might be the kings of meals on wheels, there are a ton of cities out there where tradition and innovation mix into unique melting pots... full of melting food."
 
To compile the list, the writer reached out to community experts to state why their cities are considered underrated, and what spots you should be sure to try when you visit. For the Cleveland entry, that honor fell to Sam McNulty of Market Garden Brewery.
 
"Cleveland has been punching very far above its weight in the food and craft beer scene in recent years," McNulty states. "Having traveled all over the world and been a food and beer tourist on most continents, I am still thrilled when the plane touches down here in Cleveland, and I'm back in this Mecca of local food and local beer."
 
"Forbes magazine just wrote a piece about Cleveland being the new Brooklyn. And while they meant it as a compliment, we're actually much more a new Cleveland with our own authentic and edgy flavor."
 
Read the rest right here.


thriving playhouse square neighborhood profiled in new york times

In a New York Times feature titled, "Cleveland’s Thriving Theater Hub Lures Residents," writer Erik Piepenburg outlines how Playhouse Square continues to evolve from an entertainment-only district to a 24/7 community.
 
"Residents of Midtown Manhattan are accustomed to walking to the Theater District to see what’s new on Broadway," Piepenburg writes. "But Mr. Hawley’s trip to and from Cleveland’s gilded Palace Theater was something much more significant. It was a sign, decades in the making, that this city’s efforts to create a thriving residential real estate market in its downtown core was starting to look more like a box-office hit than a flop."
 
The article ticks off positive statistics, supplied by Downtown Cleveland Alliance, that state that roughly 12,000 residents now call downtown Cleveland home, double the amount in 2000. Rental occupancy hovers near 95 percent.
 
"Almost 40 years after the closing of Jacque Brel, and after millions of dollars in renovations and area development, people are not just being entertained in Cleveland’s theater district," notes Piepenburg. "They’re calling it home."
 
Read the rest of the good news here.


another record-breaking year for cleveland international film festival

The 38th Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF), which ran for 12 days in March, again boasted record-breaking attendance figures. This year, CIFF showed 186 feature films and 168 short subjects from 68 countries to 97,804 attendees, which represents a 4.9 percent increase from 2013.

The Roxanne T. Mueller Audience Choice Award for Best Film went to Matt Shepard is a Friend of Mine, directed by Michele Josue.

Read the rest here.


the jake, er, progressive field chosen as one of best ballparks for craft beer fans

In a Daily Mail feature titled, "Best Baseball Stadiums for Craft Beer Around the Country," Cleveland's Progressive Field makes the grade.
 
"As the weather warms up, there’s not much we’d rather do than spend a Saturday at the ballpark," writes Clare Goggin Sivits. "Going to a game is always thrilling, from the rush you feel the first moment you walk through the tunnel and that emerald green field opens up before you to the memories brought back from games you experienced years ago. Even for the casual sports fan, baseball is the perfect excuse to chow down on a hot dog, nibble some nachos, and wash it all down with a beer… or three."
 
Sadly, most parks charge way too much for beer that is way below our standards. Some parks, though, buck trend by offering up great craft beer choices.
 
"Granted, you should probably have to have a reason aside from beer to actually go to these places -- say, you want to see a baseball game? But if you end up at one of these ballparks, you can count on finding a good pint of beer instead of the lame beer options you’d have to settle for elsewhere."
 
 #13: Progressive Field, Cleveland
 
Home Team: Cleveland Indians
 
"The Indians can boast a new partnership with the likes of the New Belgium Brewing Company (makers of the amazing Fat Tire), and Great Lakes Brewing Co (who can boast the killer Great Lakes Eliot Ness). This season is looking up -- the stadium lowered its (previously pretty exorbitant) concession stand prices last year, and also offers ultra-cheap PBRs, just in case."
 
Read the rest right here.


melt bar & grilled among '21 best sando shops in usa'

Thrillist, the digital magazine for men, recently published a feature on the "The 21 Best Sandwich Shops in America." Writer Adam Lapetina included Melt Bar & Grilled in the listing.

"The perfect sandwich is hard to find," Lapetina writes. "But when you do find it, you have to pay homage. From superior ingredients to the freshest-baked bread and sauces that make you say, "Dammit, I kind of want to drink that!", the ideal sammie has to strike a delicate balance, and the people who make them have hit upon something way more important than just a portable meal."

In his entry for Melt, Lapetina writes:

"Cleveland’s got its fair share of interesting people, but not all of them open tattoo-friendly, punk-rock-playing alternative grilled cheese joints, like Matt Fish did when he first founded Melt Bar & Grilled in 2006. Offering patrons who get a Melt tattoo 25% off for life is only the second of his selling points -- the first is grilling up insane grilled cheese sandwiches that keep Ohioans coming back time and time again. The Parmageddon, for example, rocks potato & onion pierogi, sauerkraut, sharp cheddar, and sauteed onions and is every bit as face-melting as its name would suggest."
 
Read the rest here.

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