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Cleveland was just named one of America's most affordable cities

Cleveland joins cities like Eugene, Oregon and Fort Walton Beach, Florida in AARP The Magazine's list of "10 of the Best American Cities to Live Comfortably on $40,000 a Year." In tandem with Sperling's Best Places, the magazine ranked cities based on factors like housing affordability, access to work and recreation, transportation, healthcare and safety to create a "livability index" rating. (Cleveland weighed in at 56, with a median housing price of $124,000.) Here's what the magazine had to say about living in The Land:

Situated on the shores of Lake Erie, Cleveland has experienced a cultural renaissance of late, led by growing populations of baby boomers and millennials alike. The city's robust art and music scene is complemented by lively nightlife and award-winning restaurants, not to mention a renewed excitement among NBA fans with the return of hometown hero LeBron James.

Read more about the 10 chosen cities here in Travel + Leisure.

13 reasons why Travelocity is "obsessed" with Cleveland

Record-breaking amounts of visitors have made their way to Cleveland in recent years, and Travelocity has taken notice—ticking off 13 reasons why it's "obsessed" with Cleveland. (Just 13? We've got at least seven more to add.) Usual suspects like Public Square, the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame lead the list, along with tasty trips to the West Side Market and that oozing-with-charm popcorn shop in Chagrin Falls. See which other attractions made the list here.
 

Raise a glass to the seven local recipients of Wine Spectator's 2017 Restaurant Awards

Wondering where to sip in style? The new class of Wine Spectator's 2017 Restaurant Awards recipients might be a great place to start. The magazine's annual awards celebrate the world's best wine lists, and this year, seven Cleveland restaurants made the discerning cut. Among the local honorees are Lola, Bold Food & Drink, Dante, Pier W, L'Albatros, Edwin's Restaurant, and Morton's, the Steakhouse. The full list of winners can be viewed here. Viva la vino!
 

Artnet News previews Clevelandís ambitious FRONT Triennial art exhibition

Set to make its splashy debut in summer 2018, the FRONT Triennial seeks to become “the most important contemporary art event in North America,” according to founder Fred Bidwell of Cleveland’s Transformer Station. Aptly titled “An American City — Eleven Cultural Exercises,” the event will span multiple days, venues and forms of programming. (Think lectures, roundtable discussions, films and more.) A roster of 60 artists assures a wide range of voices in the mix. An excerpt from Artnet’s coverage:

The roster of nearly 60 artists (which appears below) ranges from emerging figures like Cui Je, Nasser Al Salem, and Asian Dope Boys to midcareer artists like A.K. Burns and Naeem Mohaiemen to elder statesmen such as Allen Ruppersberg and the late Mike Kelley. The organizing principle of the list, the curators explained, is that the participants are in various ways responding to the idea of cities today.

“Particularly American cities are laboratories for democracy,” said Grabner, who co-curated the 2014 Whitney Biennial and is a professor at the Art Institute of Chicago. “Really interesting things flourish at the municipal level.”

“While Cleveland is a blue city,” Bidwell added, “a 15-minute ride will take you into very Republican territory, so it’s a cool place to talk about the issues of today. It’s at the crossroads of many political, cultural, and economic crosscurrents.”


See the full story and list of participating artists here.

 

LinkedIn leading the charge to close Cleveland's talent gap in health IT sector

As Ozy put it, "bioscience entrepreneurship has reshaped Cleveland's sagging economy." Yet though the Health-Tech Corridor has certainly become a hotbed for biosience, the struggle to attract health information technology (HIT) employees to the region continues to be real. Luckily, LinkedIn, BioEnterprise, Cleveland State, and other Northeast Ohio agencies are committed to closing that gap—joining forces to provide in-depth analysis and form strategies for fostering local HIT talent.
 
Government Technology had this to say about the initiative:

"One of the critical limiting factors to growth in Northeast Ohio's bioscience industry today is the availability of health IT talent," Aram Nerpouni, BioEnterprise president and CEO, said in a statement. "Thriving health IT companies are hindered by the dearth of software developers and data scientists. The LinkedIn project should provide meaningful data and analysis to inform how we address this challenge."

With the support of the Cleveland Foundation, BioEnterprise launched HIT in the CLE in 2015 to address the lack of available talent in computer and data science. The project is an important tactic within the larger HIT in the CLE talent strategy, the partners said.

LinkedIn will provide Cleveland with information of the skills local employers need, the skills its workers have and the disconnect between the two.

"The city can use those insights to create a stronger IT talent pipeline, and grow its IT industry," said LinkedIn U.S. Head of Policy Nicole Isaac in a statement.


Read the full piece here.

Reward Expert ranks Cleveland 7th on its list of best staycation cities

Planning your next vacation? You may not have to travel beyond the city limits. Reward Expert has ranked Cleveland 7th on its list of “2017’s Best Cities for Staycations.” The reward travel website compared 100 of the largest cities in the U.S. based on 29 key metrics broken down into three categories: Recreation, Food & Entertainment, and Rest & Relaxation. Cleveland’s sports success and must-sees like PlayhouseSquare and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame are cited, as well as Cleveland's “many public pools and its beaches alongside Lake Erie.” (And here's a fun fact: Cleveland has the most public pools per capita. Stay cool, Cleveland!)

Read the full write-up and see which other cities made the list here.
 

CLE deemed "on the cusp of cool" by LA Times

West Coasters who mistakenly think of Ohio as a flyover state clearly haven't been to Cleveland—but the Los Angeles Times has finally gotten the memo. This in-depth piece by Fran Golden provides an overview of all of Cleveland's greatest hits, from the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame to 78th Street Studios to the West Side Market. Local movers and shakers like Mayor Frank Jackson, Julian Bruell, and Greater Cleveland Film Commission head Ivan Schwarz all lend their voices to the story, with notable quotables like the following:
 
Local pride is also a philosophy embraced by young returnee Bruell, who said, "Cleveland shouldn't try to be like New York or Chicago or other cities. It should be unique and different."

Schwarz, of the film commission, compared what's happening in Cleveland to the renaissance of Portland, Ore.

"Old-time Clevelanders may question the cool factor. I see an untapped gold mine," he said. "I think we really should shout from the rooftop the virtues of this city."


Read the full write-up here.

Still in: local organizations vow to honor the Paris Agreement


Mayor Frank G. Jackson is joining the Mayors National Climate Action Agenda, a network of nearly 200 U.S. mayors representing over 50 million Americans in fighting climate change. The group of mayors is working together to strengthen local efforts for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and supporting efforts for binding federal and global-level policymaking.
 
Per a statement from the Mayor's office, climate policy in Washington will not affect plans underway in Cleveland to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050. That goal is part of the Office of Sustainability’s Cleveland Climate Action Plan.
 
“We’re in support of a worldwide climate action plan and we are committed to doing our part here in Cleveland. It is simply the right thing to do,” said Jackson in the statement. “We have a responsibility to leave for future generation a more green, vibrant and healthy Cleveland."

In addition, Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA) and Cleveland State University have both signed the We Are Still In open letter, which states in part:
 
"It is imperative that the world know that in the U.S., the actors that will provide the leadership necessary to meet our Paris commitment are found in city halls, state capitals, colleges and universities, investors and businesses.
 
"Together, we will remain actively engaged with the international community as part of the global effort to hold warming to well below two degrees Celsius and to accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy that will benefit our security, prosperity, and health."
 
CIA President Grafton J. Nunes said of the commitment: “Stewardship of the environment needs to be among our highest callings, and it certainly is a critical challenge for artists and designers," he noted in a statement. "Our faculty emphasizes sustainable solutions with students, although frankly most of our students have grown up with an innate understanding that they were living in an era of a changing climate. But we guide them as they consider what materials and processes they use in their art making. Some of them consider how to use their skills and social agency to improve the environment.
 
“We also model awareness of our environmental impact, through efforts to reduce the impact of our campus facilities,” Nunes added. The school's green efforts include a 300-panel solar array on the roof of the Gund building, a native-species garden atop the Peter B. Lewis Theater and the ongoing replacement of compact fluorescent lighting with high efficiency LED lights in the Gund building.
 
Fresh Water realizes that this list is not likely complete. We apologize if other area organizations have committed to the Paris Agreement. Any omissions are unintentional.
 
The Cleveland Institute of Art is part of Fresh Water's underwriting support network.
 
 

St. Luke's garners national spotlight

The National Trust for Historic Preservation shines a light on the stunning resurrection of St. Luke's in Buckeye. From Katherine Flynn for Preservation magazine:

St. Luke’s was vacant for a total of eight years, and things weren’t looking good; it was the target of vandals and copper wire prospectors, and moisture damage severely eroded the plaster on the building’s interior. In 2006, the community development organization Cleveland Neighborhood Progress (CNP) came up with what some may have called a far-fetched plan to put it back into use.

“Frankly, a lot of folks in Buckeye had just gotten used to this kind of cultural erasure happening,” says Wayne Mortensen, the director of design and development at the organization. “When businesses or institutions shut down, the buildings would fall into disrepair and they would just eventually be torn down.

“So the ability to bring that [St. Luke’s] back,” he says, “was a pretty big shot in the arm for a neighborhood that was just assuming that it would be lost.”

Read the whole story here.
 

VIDEO: Sherwin Williams takes hawking paint to a new otherwordly level

There is much more to a new 30-second ad for Sherwin Williams' Emerald paint than meets the eye. The company has been headquartered in Cleveland since 1866, but this effort is bit more technical than the longstanding "cover the earth" directive.

From Angela Natividad for Adweek:

The ad, dubbed “Epiphany,” uses only real Emerald paint. It was made possible with help from a robot arm called Spike, whose precision guidance system helped control camera movement at high rates of speed, even underwater. A Phantom camera, mounted to Spike, shot footage at 900 to 4,000 frames per second, enabling you to see colors splashing together, and creating gorgeous shapes and psychedelic combinations that the human eye can appreciate.

Production buffs will want to read the entire article. Now view the ad for yourself:



 

CREDITS
Client: Sherwin-Williams
Campaign: Emerald, Epiphany

Agency: McKinney
Chief Creative Officer: Jonathan Cude
Group Creative Directors: Jenny Nicholson, Owen Tingle
ACD, Art Director: Jordan Eakin
ACD, Copywriter: David Sloan
Group Account Director: Lisa Hughes
Account Director: Lindsley Laham
Account Supervisor: Mandy Gatton
Project Manager: Kanika Pendergrass
Executive Producer: Josh Eggleston
Director of Media: Swap Patel
Associate Media Director: Katie Swicegood
Media Supervisor: Virginia Crotty
Media Planner: Alex Grimm
Media Planner: Jimmy Patel-Nguyen
Production Company: PSYOP
Directed by: PSYOP
Creative Director: Eben Mears
Music: Beacon Street Studios
Audio Post: Sonic Union
Mix: Steve Rosen
Producer: Pat Sullivan
 

A subtle CLE cameo to appear on 'Grace and Frankie'

Art of Cloth, a women's garment company in Chagrin Falls is getting ready for its close up, so to speak.

Lily Tomlin will be seen wearing the shop's locally produced, one-of-a-kind, hand-dyed tunics on Season 3 of the Netflix series Grace and Frankie, which begins this week.
 
Courtesy of months of correspondence with the show's costume designer and stylist, two tunics made it into Lily Tomlin's wardrobe for character Frankie Bergstein: the Emma tunic in the Grape Sky colorway and the Seabreeze Tunic in the Pompeii colorway.
 
A limited quantity of both garments will be available beginning on this Friday, March 24, to coincide with series season premier. Interested parties can shop online or call 440-708-1116.
 

Fun: the NYT peeks 'behind the poster' of CPT's 'Barbecue'


The New York Times' Erik Piepenburg asks Cleveland artist Sean Higgins of The Bubble Process about what's going on in his funky poster for the Cleveland Public Theatre's current show, Barbecue, which is written by Robert O’Hara, directed by Beth Wood, and runs through March 11.

From the Q & A:

Why did you render the people in these wonderfully nonhuman colors?

It’s a big thing in illustration now to use different colors of people to make it race neutral. They are obviously different races but not black and white. It’s an oversimplified way to do people: big eyes, the bare minimum, almost cartoony in a way but trying to take a naïve approach to humans without getting detailed.


Read the whole article over at the NYT.
 

Tribeca taps "Dahmer" for 2017 lineup

The 2017 Tribeca Film Festival has named 82 of the 98 features for this year’s event. The films are listed under the categories of Spotlight, Viewpoints and Midnight as well as an array of narratives, shorts and documentaries. Special screenings, gala titles and the closing night activities have yet to be announced.

Based on the graphic novel by Cleveland artist Derf Backderf, "My Friend Dahmer," written and directed by Marc Meyers, will be screened as part of the Viewpoints category.

Per Variety:

"This year, the festival’s organizers opted to cut the total number of titles by 20 percent. 'Over the past few years, the festival has grown in a lot of ways and a lot of different directions, and there was an opportunity to think about ways to stay focused and curated in all of our slates,' said Cara Cusumano, Tribeca’s director of programming."

Further reading: Q & A with "My Friend Dahmer" author Derf Backderf

The festival runs April 19 – 30 in New York.
 

VIDEO: Khloe Kardashian loves .... Cleveland!


Khloe Kardashian, who is in a relationship with Cavs' center/power forward Tristan Thompson talked about life in Cleveland during an episode of The Talk last week.

“Everyone is so nice there,” reported Kardashian to Sharon Osbourne and the rest of the gang. “It’s a normal routine life. I love to cook, so I get to cook dinner every day. It’s this home, family thing that I’ve been craving that I get to have in Cleveland.”




“I love that it snows. I spent Christmas there and it was — snow," added Kardashian. "I’m not used to that. I’m born and raised in California, so everyone thinks I’m crazy for loving the snow. I’m like, ‘It’s snowing! This is so fun!’ and [Tristan's] like, ‘No you’re going to get over it in one year.’

"But I love it.”

Welcome to Cleveland, Khloe. As for the snow, we usually have a good bit more of it. Why not hang around and see what the weather's like next year?

 

Call for young filmmakers

Hathaway Brown and St. Edward High School have partnered to offer the 2017 iMagine Film Festival.
 
Hence, through March 31, organizers are accepting film submissions from Northeast Ohio high school students. Films must be no longer than 15 minutes in length. All finalists will receive constructive feedback from area industry professionals. Winners will receive film-related prizes.

iMagine 2017 will be held on Saturday, May 13, from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. in Hathaway's Ahuja Auditorium, 19600 North Park Blvd. The event, which will include screenings of the student films, is free and open to the public.

Click here to register and for submission details.
 
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