| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter RSS Feed

Medical Capital : In The News

67 Medical Capital Articles | Page: | Show All

LinkedIn leading the charge to close Cleveland's talent gap in health IT sector

As Ozy put it, "bioscience entrepreneurship has reshaped Cleveland's sagging economy." Yet though the Health-Tech Corridor has certainly become a hotbed for biosience, the struggle to attract health information technology (HIT) employees to the region continues to be real. Luckily, LinkedIn, BioEnterprise, Cleveland State, and other Northeast Ohio agencies are committed to closing that gap—joining forces to provide in-depth analysis and form strategies for fostering local HIT talent.
 
Government Technology had this to say about the initiative:

"One of the critical limiting factors to growth in Northeast Ohio's bioscience industry today is the availability of health IT talent," Aram Nerpouni, BioEnterprise president and CEO, said in a statement. "Thriving health IT companies are hindered by the dearth of software developers and data scientists. The LinkedIn project should provide meaningful data and analysis to inform how we address this challenge."

With the support of the Cleveland Foundation, BioEnterprise launched HIT in the CLE in 2015 to address the lack of available talent in computer and data science. The project is an important tactic within the larger HIT in the CLE talent strategy, the partners said.

LinkedIn will provide Cleveland with information of the skills local employers need, the skills its workers have and the disconnect between the two.

"The city can use those insights to create a stronger IT talent pipeline, and grow its IT industry," said LinkedIn U.S. Head of Policy Nicole Isaac in a statement.


Read the full piece here.

uptown district one of five finalists for urban excellence award

"The vibrant redevelopment of a corridor linking art, educational and healthcare institutions with surrounding neighborhoods, creating lively outdoor gathering spaces, retail shops and restaurants, student and market-rate housing, and public transit connections," stated the Bruner Foundation its website.

Read the full list of winners here.

forbes says midwest can lead the wearable tech revolution

"One region that might benefit from the rise of wearables the most, interestingly, is the Midwest," writes NorTech's Rebecca Bagley in this insightful article.

"'The rise of wearable and embedded electronics is driven by advances in printed and flexible sensor technology,” says Rick Earles, director of cluster acceleration at Team NEO. “Midwest companies are at the forefront of sensor innovation and many already offer cutting-edge products and applications.'"

Read the full story here.

cnn says cleveland is one of the 10 most innovative cities in america


In the story, CNN.com mentions Sustainable Cleveland, the double value produce perks program at farmers' markets, and the HealthLine as among the reasons why Cleveland is an innovator.

The story also links to another feature on CNN.com, which covers the urban mowing program in St. Clair Superior: "In Cleveland, sheep could be key to city's renewal."

Check out the full story here.
 

the midwest is on track for its strongest year in startup investing


"From Chicago’s city of big shoulders to the new businesses bolstering Detroit’s renaissance; in Cleveland and Cincinnati and Kansas City and St. Louis, startup economies are flourishing across the Midwest," writes Jonathan Shieber in TechCrunch.

"The proof is in events like Steve Case’s Rise of the Rest tour, a whistle-stop paean to entrepreneurship whose first leg wrapped up over the summer. Case just finished his second turn through the Midwest this month, writing $100,000 checks to winners of pitch competitions in cities like Madison, Wis., Minneapolis, Des Moines, St. Louis and Kansas City."

Read the full story here.
 

cnn reports on cle heartlab and health-tech corridor

In a CNN Money feature titled “Cleveland: Booming in more ways than Lebron,” Tom Thriveni reports on the work being done at Cleveland Heartlab specifically and the Health-Tech Corridor in general.

“[Jake] Orville is the CEO of five-year-old Cleveland Heartlab, which has licensed several innovations from researchers at nearby -- and world-renowned -- Cleveland Clinic. The partnership was initiated by the clinic as part of its mission to turn its inventions into commercially viable medical products, generating profits for both parties. To date, besides Heartlab, 66 neighboring companies have spun out from Cleveland Clinic ideas since 2000. All told, the clinic has 525 patents and 450 licensing agreements,” Thriveni writes.

“The 1,600-acre Health-Tech Corridor acts as Cleveland's biomedical nerve center, housing three major health-care institutions besides the Cleveland Clinic, four higher education institutions, more than 130 biomedical and other technology companies and eight incubators that lease space and provide consulting and other business development services. This is where the Cleveland Clinic and other partner organizations, such as incubator BioEnterprise, interact with researchers, clinical caregivers, academics and business executives. State-funded groups like Team NEO (for North East Ohio) were launched to help attract new business to the region. Since Cleveland Heartlab opened in the Health-Tech Corridor's first building, eight additional buildings have opened for tenants. A ninth will open soon.”
 
Read the rest here.

cleveland clinic's new herbal therapy ward highlighted in time mag

In a Time feature titled "Cleveland Clinic’s New Medicine," Alexandra Sifferlin writes about the Cleveland Clinic's nonconforming efforts to incorporate Eastern herbal medicine with traditional Western medical practices.
 
"Though herbal therapy has been practiced in China for centuries, it is still an afterthought in the U.S., in part because pharmaceutical remedies are usually easier to obtain," Sifferlin writes. "Now that’s beginning to change: in January, the Cleveland Clinic opened a Chinese herbal-therapy ward."
 
In this small division, therapists at the clinic treat patients suffering from chronic pain, fatigue, poor digestion, infertility and sleep disorders.
 
“Western medicine may not have all the answers,” Daniel Neides, the clinic’s medical director, is quoted in the piece.
 
A certified herbalist runs the unit under the supervision of Western-trained doctors. Patients must be referred to the clinic by their doctor, who must oversee their treatment for at least a year.
 
Executives at the Cleveland Clinic say the clinic "is the first of its kind to be affiliated with a Western hospital."
 
“We’re incorporating ancient knowledge into patient care,” says in-house herbalist Galina Roofener.
 
Read the rest of the news right here.
 

cleveland clinic exports marquee brand to abu dhabi

In a Reuters article titled, "Cleveland Clinic exports marquee Ohio brand to Abu Dhabi," by Robin Respaut writes about the Clinic's plans to open a hospital on Al Maryah Island in Abu Dhabi.
 
"For decades the Cleveland Clinic has provided healthcare to the upper echelons of Middle Eastern society who fly halfway across the world for treatment at the Ohio-based private medical center," she writes. "Soon, they can skip the trip."
 
Early next year, the Cleveland Clinic will open an ultra-modern, 364-bed hospital on Al Maryah Island in Abu Dhabi. The Clinic currently helps manage the Sheikh Khalifa Medical City facility in Abu Dhabi, but this will be the first time it puts its name and personnel in the region.
 
"We look at it as our petrodollars coming home to Cleveland," Cleveland Clinic's chief executive officer Dr Toby Cosgrove said during an interview. "It's money coming back to us."
 
Read more about the state-of-the-art facility here.


cleveland goes from butt of hollywood jokes to a hub of innovation

In a lengthy feature titled "Hiding Out in Ohio: Bioscience," Tom Thriveni, writing for the digital mag Ozymandias, covers the burgeoning bioscience industry in Cleveland.

"Just as robotics companies in Pittsburgh and high-speed fiber-optic networks in Chattanooga have helped transform the economies of those cities, bioscience entrepreneurship has reshaped Cleveland’s sagging economy," he writes.

"The [Cleveland Heartlab and Cleveland Clinic] partnership was initiated by the clinic as part of its mission to turn its inventions into commercially viable medical products, generating profits for both parties. To date, besides Heartlab, 66 neighboring companies have spun out from Cleveland Clinic ideas since 2000. All told, the clinic has 525 patents and 450 licensing agreements."

Read the rest of the good news here.


ny times gives ink to new rust belt mag 'belt'

In a New York Times Arts Beat post titled “New Magazine Celebrates ‘Rust Belt Chic,’ With a Wink,” writer Jennifer Schuessler details her conversation with Belt magazine editor Anne Trubek about a new publication dedicated to fostering a new journalistic beat in Cleveland.
 
"The decaying cities of the post-industrial Midwest can sometimes seem like a museum of things America used to make: cars, refrigerators, steel, televisions. But if a start-up in Cleveland gets its way, the region may help rebuild the market for another endangered product -- long-form magazine journalism," Schuessler writes.
The magazine offers up a collection of essays and reporting that seeks to explore the regional identity that is known as the Rust Belt.
 
“I cringe at words like ‘authentic,’” Trubek says in the article. “But the rust belt aesthetic isn’t about the ephemeral global economy, it’s about boots on the ground and things hidden in grandma’s attic. We want to explore that.”
 
Check out the full interview here.


clinic's cosgrove aims to improve health of residents and city

In a lengthy Forbes feature titled "City Surgeon: Can The Cleveland Clinic Save Its Hometown?" writer Matthew Herper reports on Delos “Toby” Cosgrove's tenure at the Cleveland Clinic and his efforts to leverage healthcare to improve the Clinic's neighborhood and the region's economy.
 
"The rough old neighborhood is a distant memory, replaced by a gleaming testament to modern medicine stretching out over 46 buildings and covering 167 acres. Protected by a dedicated 141-trooper force of state police, there is a conference center, a fancy hotel and a farmers’ market. Over Cosgrove’s tenure the clinic’s revenues have nearly doubled to $6.2 billion."
 
But Cosgrove's biggest brainstorm was to build a "giant mall for hospital buyers." 
 
"Think about the things that go into a hospital. Shades, televisions, chairs, tables, wall coverings, all the medical gear, the operating tables, you name it,” Cosgrove is quoted in the piece.
 
"What is emerging is an Epcot Center for med tech. GE Healthcare, Siemens, Philips Health Care and Cardinal Health are among the 22 confirmed tenants in the soon-to-be-completed center. Next door, Bennett has already booked conventions that will bring 89,395 attendees this year and 100,400 next. By the end of 2016, he says, bookings should be enough to pay back the $465 million it took to construct both buildings."
 
“It will begin to influence the city as it comes back and make it a destination medical city,” Cosgrove predicts.
 
Read the rest of the article here.


young companies and startups aid both local and state economies

In a Techli story titled “Greater Cleveland Startups Improve Ohio With Jobs, Tax Dollars and Impact,” writer Annie Zaleski explores how important startups and young companies are to the success of a region’s economy.
 
In a study from Cleveland State University, a report found that 127 young companies generated $270 million in economic benefits for Ohio in 2012 alone.
 
“The companies in the report -- a group comprised of businesses that successfully leveraged things such as business assistance or seed capital -- helped create and retain 1,100 in-state direct jobs (with a total Ohio employment impact of 2,140). In the last three years, these very young companies are already contributing significantly -- more than $688 million -- to Ohio’s economy.”
 
The story goes on to discuss that the figures only represent a small portion of development in the region and do not encompass all of Northeast Ohio. Taking that into account, the importance of startups and young companies on the economy becomes even more significant.
 
Enjoy the full piece here.

cleveland clinic, university hospitals make best hospitals list

In a Huffington Post report titled “Best Hospitals: US News releases 2013-2014 Ranking,” Kimberly Leonard of US News shares the year's best hospitals, with two of Cleveland’s own making the list.
 
Among the best, University Hospitals Case Medical Center ranked at No. 18, while the Cleveland Clinic came in at No. 4 behind the Mayo Clinic, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Hospital.
 
The Cleveland Clinic did receive the top honors for Cardiology and Heart Surgery.
 
“Just five metropolitan areas have more than one Honor Roll hospital. New York City and Boston achieved this feat last year as well, and were joined this year by Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Cleveland, due to the additions of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital (which landed on the coveted list for the first time), and University Hospitals Case Medical Center respectively.”
 
Read the full piece here.
 

lou reed gets life-saving transplant at cle clinic

"Lou Reed is recovering after receiving a liver transplant last month," an article in the Rolling Stone begins. That life-saving surgery was performed at the Cleveland Clinic.

The 71-year-old rock god chose the Clinic over facilities in New York because of the "dysfunctional state of hospitals in New York," his wife reported.
 
"I am a triumph of modern medicine, physics and chemistry," Reed said. "I am bigger and stronger than stronger than ever."

Read the rest of the news here.


cleveland clinic cmo credited for making brand most recognizable

In a Forbes Magazine post titled “Behind the Brand: CMO Paul Matsen On Cleveland Clinic’s Strides As A Global Marketer,” Jennifer Rooney explains how Paul Matsen has taken his experience from prior endeavors such as Delta Air Lines and worked to establish Cleveland Clinic as one of the most recognizable healthcare brands in the world.
 
From the use of digital, social and traditional media, Matsen's primary goal is to increase brand awareness and ultimately get “those who don’t even need its services yet -- but may someday -- to “get consumers to find out who we are and then in the future for them to consider us as one of their first choices.”
 
Read the full piece and watch the interview here.

67 Medical Capital Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts